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Have you ever gotten yourself into some sticky situations?

You haven’t?

Oh…

I guess you don’t need me anymore. It’s fine. I’ll get over it. Now I know how parenting feels. So thanks for that.

If you have gotten into some sticky situations, however, you’re in the right place. This is a very special article. Why? Because engaging in sticky situations is my forte. Therefore, I have a lot of advice for how to navigate said situations. You’ll be a pro in no time.

So I haven’t been to one of my classes in a while, and when I finally went to the class this past week, the professor asked me if I was a prospie (a.k.a. prospective student, keep up!) visiting the class. What do I do?

Seems like you’re going to have a lot of explaining to do. Seriously. I suggest going into office hours and explaining what happened (Were you injured/sick and never told the professor? Are you being lazy and wasting your tuition money?). Either way, you need to come clean, [wo]man! Also, start going to class. Even if you think you’re a know-it-all, you aren’t. I promise. I’m telling you this with love, in a constructive criticism type of way.

There’s this person who I run into all of the time, but can never remember the name of. We have known each other long enough now that it’s too awkward for me to ask what their name is again after so long. How do I figure out their name and how do I remember it?

They ask me if [this happens to me] every day, and I say often. Seriously, I am the QUEEN of forgetting names. Here’s what I do in these situations:

  • Open Facebook/Instagram
  • Think of anyone you have seen this person with
  • Look that person up on Facebook/Instagram and start going through their pictures
  • Hopefully, you’ll find a picture of both of these people together AND hopefully, the picture is tagged with the name of the person you forgot the name of
  • Keep trying with different friends of that person until you are successful

I am soooooo bad at small talk. Do you have any tips for me?

To me, the best way to combat the awkward we-only-talk-about-the-weather conversations is to remember a few specific details about the person you are talking to. Did the person you are talking to just get a new job or a new pet? Does this person like art? Music? Little details like these are great conversation starters. Even better if you have the same interests.

Have you never met this person before? The best way to start a conversation is to have people talk about themselves. People love talking about themselves. Ask them questions about their interests and hobbies. Once you do, I promise that the conversation will flow. You’ll be a pro at small talk in no time.

There is someone on these campuses who is friends with my friends but who makes me super uncomfortable. What do I do?

I would like to start this off by including the contact information for different groups that may be better equipped for advising and supporting you during these situations.

Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services:

Phone: (909) 621-8202

After hours emergency: (909) 621-8202 **press 1 for the on-call therapist

Claremont McKenna Advocates for Survivors of Sexual Assault (every school at the 5Cs has an advocates group FYI):

[email protected]

https://www.facebook.com/CMCadvocates/ (can message and call advocates through Facebook page)

Hotline (Thursday-Monday): (909) 377-2400

That being said, and establishing that I am by no means an expert on this, here’s what I think.

Do you feel comfortable talking to someone about it?

  • Ask someone to politely remove the person/ask them not to invite the person that makes you uncomfortable in the first place.
  • Contact one of the resources listed above.

Do you feel uncomfortable talking to anyone about it?

  • You need to prioritize your personal health and safety. Just remove yourself. I know it sucks because you shouldn’t be the one who has to remove yourself from these situations. Afterward, you can think about whether you would like to seek some outside help/advice for how to handle your specific situation (you can look to the resources I have listed above, or look online, where there are a lot more resources available).

Just remember, either way, you aren’t alone and you have a voice!

Peace and love,

Maya