SHARE

Update from the Author: “The author was dumb in college.  He no longer holds these views.  -Jan 20, 2017”

Citing the song as a timeless tribute to strong women everywhere, Scripps students voted unanimously for the new anthem. Incoming freshman Rebecca Draper was ecstatic at the news: “The song really speaks to me as a feminist. I think if we all took its message to heart and just had a little more understanding for each other, the world would be a better place.”

Newly selected President Bettison-Varga couldn’t be reached for this article, but rumors are circulating that she’s planning a blowout dance party in the Scripps parking lot to ring in the new anthem.

Well actually, not really, but sometimes I wonder.(1) Personally, I’ve had enough. Enough of the ideology that lets girls plaster “You count. Calories don’t.” all over their walls one moment and then lets them play this childish game of hide the crouton. I’m tired of seeing fliers for “Wellness Seminars” next to girls with protruding collarbones. I’m disgusted at the pathetic show of friendship that Scripps girls show when they insist their friends are strong women whatever the reality. Mostly I’m disheartened because I fear that genuine acts of courage like Zoe Larkins’ will be lost in this sea of bullshit.

Isn’t there something seriously wrong with the culture of Scripps? It’s as if the college specializes in deterritorialization: universal concepts are everywhere stripped from their meaning and become free-floating injunctions. And I’m not the only one who sees this:

“What I find most difficult about Scripps women is their willingness to speak out on how terrible eating disorders are, how we should all appreciate our own bodies, how we should grant ourselves permission to enjoy food because we deserve to nourish our bodies—and yet these same women engage in disordered eating and constant exercising.” –Alicia Jenkins (in response to a post on the Voice)

Wellness blurs into disordered eating seamlessly. Extolling the virtues of a healthy lifestyle and then having a carrot for dinner has no contradiction because that pronouncement had no ontological meaning. The declaration existed purely in the symbolic – a perfect breeding ground for this kind of hyperideology. Its principles – therapeutic wellness, female empowerment, etc. – are so structured, so crystalline that the actual meanings underlying them apparently are irrelevant.just dance

Consider the core of Scripps’ ideology: Feminism. I always thought the underlying point of Feminism specifically (and the civil rights moment generally) was that you are supposed to judge people on “the content of their character, not [arbitrary things like] the color of their skin.” Yet all too often at Scripps that ideal encapsulated in words like “Feminism” or “Freedom” is disconnected from its actual meaning and made to serve as a blunt reaction. If Scripps’ “Feminists” were really as committed to Feminism as it should be defined, they would be just as outraged at the discrepancy between the percentages of men and women going to higher education as they are about the wage gap.

In a sense, I think I can see where they’re coming from. You look at humanity’s recent history, and it’s dominated by white males. That history includes some pretty fucked up things, including the forced domestication of women. I imagine it’s easy to be consumed by the scope of that history and the magnitude of that blatant injustice. So consumed that you feel the need to fight it with everything you’ve got. That understandability, though, doesn’t make it ok.

Far from it. Besides being simply wrong, the idea that only white males are racist is totalitarian. You’ve set up strict intellectual limits around something that delineates it completely. What’s racism? It’s the pejorative actions that white males take against other races. Oh, ok. I had no idea it was that simple. Neat-o. Similarly it’s totalitarian to try to force all discourse through the lens of gender. Our world is actually too complicated for that. Though I suppose, to be fair, if they’re feeling intellectually expansive, Scrippsies will include race and other historically underprivileged groups as means to valuable insight.

Perversely, this shuttered way of thinking can come full circle and be detrimental to women’s rights. Take the following quote from the Scripps’ Voice for example:

“Many expressed a disparity between the empowerment they are supposed to feel at a women’s college, and the strong image consciousness they observe on campus. This might reflect, some students suggested, a lack of basic feminist education. Why, someone suggested, didn’t we study feminist theory in Core I?” (2)

I don’t get how any self-respecting woman doesn’t feel insulted by this statement. Are women supposed to feel less empowered when they’re not at a women’s college? Do they need the company of other women to feel that they have authority and power? Or is it just that the girls that go to a women’s college are somehow weaker, need empowering? Note too the immediate turn to Feminism. Maybe that’s actually what’s needed in this case, but I can’t help but be cynical. As empowered, strong women, might the students of Scripps College need education in something other than their gender to combat this pernicious image consciousness?2 Like maybe the superego: stop fucking caring about what other people think.scripps

There’s an eerily similarity between this Scripps’ ideology and Tyra Banks on her show America’s Next Top Model [excerpted from a post on More Intelligent Life, an Economist publication]:

“And this is where the paradox of Tyra comes to a head. She hugs and gives rehearsed counsel to the eliminated contestant, encouraging her to still follow her dreams. But to emphasize inner strength in a game where success hinges on ten pounds or a bad photo is dishonest. Tyra has a chilling ability to shuffle among masks without acknowledging their incoherence, which is an eerie quality for a self-styled self-empowerment guru to have, since it obscures any idea of a “self” to begin with. But it is also, in a nutshell, the only learned skill that a model must possess.”

Can’t you picture Scrippsies doing the same song and dance, telling their friends to eat and be healthy, while simultaneously judging their every nutritional move in the cold war of calorie attrition? This weird ideology has claimed enough casualties. So I say enough of this mental Valium that they call wellness talks, enough of this femino-centric worldview, and enough of this cycle of bullshit generally. Scrippsies – like all budding young adults – need an education in how to live as responsible, productive, and fulfilled people, pure and simple. Feminism and wellness and all that other jazz they love up there can be a part of that, but just that: a part. Life demands and the Scripps young women deserve much more than this lame culture of broken ideals.

——————————————————————————————
(1) In the interest of full disclosure, I must confess: I read the Scripps Voice. I know, I know. But how else would I find gems like this? “It is always the time to question our policies, but now we need to do so with the expectation that the decided solution will succeed.” I mean it takes something really special to be that confident with that level of internal contradiction. Personally, I think every writer for the Scripps Voice secretly aspires to be a host on the View. But I digress.
(2) Because aren’t they supposed to be treated as members of humanity – not simply as an elaboration of a sociophysical construct like gender?

  • B

    Last paragraph= A+. Wear it, Scripps. To quote from your article, Scripps girls really should care less about what other people think.

    More empowered women? Coulda fooled me.

    In addition, what is empowering about the song? Getting hosed tonight? Dangg, Scripps. Way to stay classy.

  • B

    Last paragraph= A+. Wear it, Scripps. To quote from your article, Scripps girls really should care less about what other people think.

    More empowered women? Coulda fooled me.

    In addition, what is empowering about the song? Getting hosed tonight? Dangg, Scripps. Way to stay classy.

  • B

    Last paragraph= A+. Wear it, Scripps. To quote from your article, Scripps girls really should care less about what other people think.

    More empowered women? Coulda fooled me.

    In addition, what is empowering about the song? Getting hosed tonight? Dangg, Scripps. Way to stay classy.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    Did a Scripps girl just dump you or something? Yilkes! It’s amazing how you can take a great idea – the hypocrisy of our outside emphasis on loving ourselves and each other despite rampant eating disorders on campus (great point about Tyra, too) – and turn it into an attack on a million little preconceptions you have about the student body, the curriculum, and women’s colleges in general.

    Let me correct a few egregious errors: Scripps’s ideology is not “feminism.” Feminism is only a mere part of an ideology that encompasses educating women to enter society as fully formed, independent thinkers. Yes, that does involve telling women that they deserve the same rights and respect as their male counterparts, but it is not the only thing that Scripps sets out to do.

    Second of all, I do not see how the suggestion that a woman should feel empowered when surrounded by some of the most intellectually accomplished of her peers would be offensive. Girls do not choose to go to women’s college’s because they are afraid to go elsewhere; they go to women’s colleges because historically, women who have attended women’s colleges fare better in the male-dominated working world because they have been empowered. Although women who have graduated from women’s colleges make up less than 3% of the total female workforce, of female C.E.O’s at fortune 1000 companies, they make up 1/3, and they make up 1/4 of female congresspeople (The Current US Secretary of State graduated from a women’s college, too) These are not “weak” women, Patrick. They are women who would rather succeed than be held back by a coed environment.

    And finally, I have to voice my disappointment in the title of your article, which may have been hilarious had this article been a commentary on what “Just Dance” is actually about – a drunk girl. Although if that was what you found so terrible about Scripps, I think you’d have to include the female student body of your own college in that assessment.

    Maybe you should take a page out of Zoe’s book and speak from what you have actually experienced, which is clearly not life at Scripps.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    Did a Scripps girl just dump you or something? Yilkes! It’s amazing how you can take a great idea – the hypocrisy of our outside emphasis on loving ourselves and each other despite rampant eating disorders on campus (great point about Tyra, too) – and turn it into an attack on a million little preconceptions you have about the student body, the curriculum, and women’s colleges in general.

    Let me correct a few egregious errors: Scripps’s ideology is not “feminism.” Feminism is only a mere part of an ideology that encompasses educating women to enter society as fully formed, independent thinkers. Yes, that does involve telling women that they deserve the same rights and respect as their male counterparts, but it is not the only thing that Scripps sets out to do.

    Second of all, I do not see how the suggestion that a woman should feel empowered when surrounded by some of the most intellectually accomplished of her peers would be offensive. Girls do not choose to go to women’s college’s because they are afraid to go elsewhere; they go to women’s colleges because historically, women who have attended women’s colleges fare better in the male-dominated working world because they have been empowered. Although women who have graduated from women’s colleges make up less than 3% of the total female workforce, of female C.E.O’s at fortune 1000 companies, they make up 1/3, and they make up 1/4 of female congresspeople (The Current US Secretary of State graduated from a women’s college, too) These are not “weak” women, Patrick. They are women who would rather succeed than be held back by a coed environment.

    And finally, I have to voice my disappointment in the title of your article, which may have been hilarious had this article been a commentary on what “Just Dance” is actually about – a drunk girl. Although if that was what you found so terrible about Scripps, I think you’d have to include the female student body of your own college in that assessment.

    Maybe you should take a page out of Zoe’s book and speak from what you have actually experienced, which is clearly not life at Scripps.

    • CMC guy

      word, this was called for

    • CMC guy

      word, this was called for

      • Max Mautner

        It was stupid of me to make my comment anonymous.

      • Max Mautner

        It was stupid of me to make my comment anonymous.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    Did a Scripps girl just dump you or something? Yilkes! It’s amazing how you can take a great idea – the hypocrisy of our outside emphasis on loving ourselves and each other despite rampant eating disorders on campus (great point about Tyra, too) – and turn it into an attack on a million little preconceptions you have about the student body, the curriculum, and women’s colleges in general.

    Let me correct a few egregious errors: Scripps’s ideology is not “feminism.” Feminism is only a mere part of an ideology that encompasses educating women to enter society as fully formed, independent thinkers. Yes, that does involve telling women that they deserve the same rights and respect as their male counterparts, but it is not the only thing that Scripps sets out to do.

    Second of all, I do not see how the suggestion that a woman should feel empowered when surrounded by some of the most intellectually accomplished of her peers would be offensive. Girls do not choose to go to women’s college’s because they are afraid to go elsewhere; they go to women’s colleges because historically, women who have attended women’s colleges fare better in the male-dominated working world because they have been empowered. Although women who have graduated from women’s colleges make up less than 3% of the total female workforce, of female C.E.O’s at fortune 1000 companies, they make up 1/3, and they make up 1/4 of female congresspeople (The Current US Secretary of State graduated from a women’s college, too) These are not “weak” women, Patrick. They are women who would rather succeed than be held back by a coed environment.

    And finally, I have to voice my disappointment in the title of your article, which may have been hilarious had this article been a commentary on what “Just Dance” is actually about – a drunk girl. Although if that was what you found so terrible about Scripps, I think you’d have to include the female student body of your own college in that assessment.

    Maybe you should take a page out of Zoe’s book and speak from what you have actually experienced, which is clearly not life at Scripps.

    • CMC guy

      word, this was called for

      • Max Mautner

        It was stupid of me to make my comment anonymous.

  • Jamie

    It’s not really like tyra because they have wellness meetings and “i love my body” stickers because so many of them have eating disorders. Its a cause and effect thing not just like a hypocrit thing.

  • Jamie

    It’s not really like tyra because they have wellness meetings and “i love my body” stickers because so many of them have eating disorders. Its a cause and effect thing not just like a hypocrit thing.

  • Jamie

    It’s not really like tyra because they have wellness meetings and “i love my body” stickers because so many of them have eating disorders. Its a cause and effect thing not just like a hypocrit thing.

  • Michelle

    It’s like you made a list of all the problems women have and attributed them to Scrippsies in an article that generalizes the views and opinions of a few individuals to a whole student body. Even if you were right in saying that all Scrippsies are weak, body-conscious individuals, why is it OK if if a CMC girl, or any other girl, acts the same, but a crime warranting a full opinion piece when a Scripps girl does? You say, “stop fucking caring about what other people think” as if you expect Scrippsies to whip out their habits and commit to a life of self-denial.

  • Michelle

    It’s like you made a list of all the problems women have and attributed them to Scrippsies in an article that generalizes the views and opinions of a few individuals to a whole student body. Even if you were right in saying that all Scrippsies are weak, body-conscious individuals, why is it OK if if a CMC girl, or any other girl, acts the same, but a crime warranting a full opinion piece when a Scripps girl does? You say, “stop fucking caring about what other people think” as if you expect Scrippsies to whip out their habits and commit to a life of self-denial.

  • Michelle

    It’s like you made a list of all the problems women have and attributed them to Scrippsies in an article that generalizes the views and opinions of a few individuals to a whole student body. Even if you were right in saying that all Scrippsies are weak, body-conscious individuals, why is it OK if if a CMC girl, or any other girl, acts the same, but a crime warranting a full opinion piece when a Scripps girl does? You say, “stop fucking caring about what other people think” as if you expect Scrippsies to whip out their habits and commit to a life of self-denial.

  • Dave

    As a male CMCer Patrick, I felt like this article was overly harsh and rather unfair to women. Like “I go to Scripps and I eat” said, feminism is far from the core ideology of Scripps. The broad stereotypes and characterizations you engage about Scripps are about as true as the stereotypes that all CMC students are jocks, obsessed with making money, arrogant, and that they drink all day.

    I commend you for having the balls to write a controversial article. And if you had written something else, there’s a good chance I would support you. But honestly, on this one, I just think you’re wrong.

    • John Morris

      Correct me if I’m wrong Dave, but I think the CMC Forum compensates its staff writers at least in part based on the number of hits and comments their articles receive. If so, I don’t think it takes “balls” to write a controversial article so much as it requires a desire for notoriety and some extra spending money.

      Also, as someone who only sometimes reads Forum articles, it is precisely this sort of writing that makes me never want to return. Maybe it’s just the nature of opinion writing, but the articles here are so laden with overstatements that I want to pull my hair out. You could have made a strong point with this article Patrick, but I have to agree with the others and say that you botched it. Big time.

      • Focus and Concision are Wonder

        “You could have made a strong point with this article Patrick, but I have to agree with the others and say that you botched it. Big time.”

        I couldn’t agree more, John. SR, represent.

        The Forum’s got a lot going for it (certainly more than was true a few years ago). But the preponderance of hyperbolic, far-reaching, insulting articles like this one make me less inclined to give you another unique hit.

        Patrick: I sincerely believe that you’re a smart, articulate guy, but you always seem to extend beyond what the situation warrants. There was a valid and interesting point in this article, but you buried it beneath generalizations, attacks, and exaggeration. Focus is your friend.

      • Focus and Concision are Wonder

        “You could have made a strong point with this article Patrick, but I have to agree with the others and say that you botched it. Big time.”

        I couldn’t agree more, John. SR, represent.

        The Forum’s got a lot going for it (certainly more than was true a few years ago). But the preponderance of hyperbolic, far-reaching, insulting articles like this one make me less inclined to give you another unique hit.

        Patrick: I sincerely believe that you’re a smart, articulate guy, but you always seem to extend beyond what the situation warrants. There was a valid and interesting point in this article, but you buried it beneath generalizations, attacks, and exaggeration. Focus is your friend.

    • John Morris

      Correct me if I’m wrong Dave, but I think the CMC Forum compensates its staff writers at least in part based on the number of hits and comments their articles receive. If so, I don’t think it takes “balls” to write a controversial article so much as it requires a desire for notoriety and some extra spending money.

      Also, as someone who only sometimes reads Forum articles, it is precisely this sort of writing that makes me never want to return. Maybe it’s just the nature of opinion writing, but the articles here are so laden with overstatements that I want to pull my hair out. You could have made a strong point with this article Patrick, but I have to agree with the others and say that you botched it. Big time.

  • Dave

    As a male CMCer Patrick, I felt like this article was overly harsh and rather unfair to women. Like “I go to Scripps and I eat” said, feminism is far from the core ideology of Scripps. The broad stereotypes and characterizations you engage about Scripps are about as true as the stereotypes that all CMC students are jocks, obsessed with making money, arrogant, and that they drink all day.

    I commend you for having the balls to write a controversial article. And if you had written something else, there’s a good chance I would support you. But honestly, on this one, I just think you’re wrong.

  • Dave

    As a male CMCer Patrick, I felt like this article was overly harsh and rather unfair to women. Like “I go to Scripps and I eat” said, feminism is far from the core ideology of Scripps. The broad stereotypes and characterizations you engage about Scripps are about as true as the stereotypes that all CMC students are jocks, obsessed with making money, arrogant, and that they drink all day.

    I commend you for having the balls to write a controversial article. And if you had written something else, there’s a good chance I would support you. But honestly, on this one, I just think you’re wrong.

    • John Morris

      Correct me if I’m wrong Dave, but I think the CMC Forum compensates its staff writers at least in part based on the number of hits and comments their articles receive. If so, I don’t think it takes “balls” to write a controversial article so much as it requires a desire for notoriety and some extra spending money.

      Also, as someone who only sometimes reads Forum articles, it is precisely this sort of writing that makes me never want to return. Maybe it’s just the nature of opinion writing, but the articles here are so laden with overstatements that I want to pull my hair out. You could have made a strong point with this article Patrick, but I have to agree with the others and say that you botched it. Big time.

      • Emily Meinhardt

        Clarification: Summer writers were offered a minimal stipend (this counts as a summer post because we haven’t hired Fall writers yet). In the past, writers have been paid on a per article basis or given a stipend. It is not in the plans to pay for hits or comments. But we love a vibrant discussion…oh yes we do.

      • Focus and Concision are Wonderful Things

        “You could have made a strong point with this article Patrick, but I have to agree with the others and say that you botched it. Big time.”

        I couldn’t agree more, John. SR, represent.

        The Forum’s got a lot going for it (certainly more than was true a few years ago). But the preponderance of hyperbolic, far-reaching, insulting articles like this one make me less inclined to give you another unique hit.

        Patrick: I sincerely believe that you’re a smart, articulate guy, but you always seem to extend beyond what the situation warrants. There was a valid and interesting point in this article, but you buried it beneath generalizations, attacks, and exaggeration. Focus is your friend.

  • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

    You, sir, are ballsy. And, characteristically, this is way, way longer than it is needs to be.

    I’m glad to hear you make the case against the indoctrination that passes for education in some of Scripps’ core and I always give props to people who show the emperor has no clothes, but I’m struck wondering where’s the there, there in this argument?

    Having walked through Scripps, I frankly don’t see any evidence of this calorie cold war of attrition. There are fat women, skinny women, average women, hot women, and ugly women. In short, when I go to Scripps, I see women. And it is much the same sample size I see when I go to CMC.

    So, as much I admire you for writing this, what’s the point? Other than to score a few cheap points with some of the CMC women that hate on the Scrippsies for stealing their men?

  • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

    You, sir, are ballsy. And, characteristically, this is way, way longer than it is needs to be.

    I’m glad to hear you make the case against the indoctrination that passes for education in some of Scripps’ core and I always give props to people who show the emperor has no clothes, but I’m struck wondering where’s the there, there in this argument?

    Having walked through Scripps, I frankly don’t see any evidence of this calorie cold war of attrition. There are fat women, skinny women, average women, hot women, and ugly women. In short, when I go to Scripps, I see women. And it is much the same sample size I see when I go to CMC.

    So, as much I admire you for writing this, what’s the point? Other than to score a few cheap points with some of the CMC women that hate on the Scrippsies for stealing their men?

  • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

    You, sir, are ballsy. And, characteristically, this is way, way longer than it is needs to be.

    I’m glad to hear you make the case against the indoctrination that passes for education in some of Scripps’ core and I always give props to people who show the emperor has no clothes, but I’m struck wondering where’s the there, there in this argument?

    Having walked through Scripps, I frankly don’t see any evidence of this calorie cold war of attrition. There are fat women, skinny women, average women, hot women, and ugly women. In short, when I go to Scripps, I see women. And it is much the same sample size I see when I go to CMC.

    So, as much I admire you for writing this, what’s the point? Other than to score a few cheap points with some of the CMC women that hate on the Scrippsies for stealing their men?

  • Joe

    I’m gonna go out on a limb and guess that one of these applies to you:

    A. Recently dumped by a Scrippsie.
    B. Recently rejected by a Scrippsie.
    C. Recently lost an argument about feminism to a Scrippsie.
    D. All of the above.

    …because it definitely comes across as you being really bitter about something. Writing an article about an anthem change: okay. Writing a creepy, angry, 16-paragraph, borderline misogynistic rant about an anthem change: less okay.

  • Joe

    I’m gonna go out on a limb and guess that one of these applies to you:

    A. Recently dumped by a Scrippsie.
    B. Recently rejected by a Scrippsie.
    C. Recently lost an argument about feminism to a Scrippsie.
    D. All of the above.

    …because it definitely comes across as you being really bitter about something. Writing an article about an anthem change: okay. Writing a creepy, angry, 16-paragraph, borderline misogynistic rant about an anthem change: less okay.

  • S

    “In addition, what is empowering about the song? Getting hosed tonight? Dangg, Scripps. Way to stay classy.”

    You missed it, hun. He’s being sarcastic.

    And to the author: A Scripps education is not closed-minded and hypocritical, as you claim. I’m wondering where you got your data. For instance, you claim Scrippsies are taught “that only white males are racist” and that they “try to force all discourse through the lens of gender.” I am a Scripps student, and no class I’ve attended has ever operated under such outrageous pretenses. Furthermore, why in the hell WOULD “any self-respecting woman,” as you put it, be insulted by the Voice’s claim? A women’s college IS supposed to empower women. That’s why we’re here. There ARE disparities between how women learn at co-ed institutions and how they learn at all-women colleges. Sexism does still permeate society. It is not just an historical fact we need to overcome, it is a reality.

    Furthermore, I’m sure there are women on campus who extol healthy eating while starving themselves. But that kind of hypocrisy does not define a Scripps education and it does not define all Scripps women. The women who do operate that way have serious insecurities and need help. Be careful of making sweeping generalizations. They are dangerous and irresponsible.

  • S

    “In addition, what is empowering about the song? Getting hosed tonight? Dangg, Scripps. Way to stay classy.”

    You missed it, hun. He’s being sarcastic.

    And to the author: A Scripps education is not closed-minded and hypocritical, as you claim. I’m wondering where you got your data. For instance, you claim Scrippsies are taught “that only white males are racist” and that they “try to force all discourse through the lens of gender.” I am a Scripps student, and no class I’ve attended has ever operated under such outrageous pretenses. Furthermore, why in the hell WOULD “any self-respecting woman,” as you put it, be insulted by the Voice’s claim? A women’s college IS supposed to empower women. That’s why we’re here. There ARE disparities between how women learn at co-ed institutions and how they learn at all-women colleges. Sexism does still permeate society. It is not just an historical fact we need to overcome, it is a reality.

    Furthermore, I’m sure there are women on campus who extol healthy eating while starving themselves. But that kind of hypocrisy does not define a Scripps education and it does not define all Scripps women. The women who do operate that way have serious insecurities and need help. Be careful of making sweeping generalizations. They are dangerous and irresponsible.

    • B

      Haha, I didn’t miss it. But if he’d focus on what a rediculous anthem it was for Scripps, it would probably have received less criticism, since no one can argue how stupid it is, and ask what does it actually represent? Feminism? Really?

      • B

        Oops. Screw that all. I was writing that too early in the morning and missed the whole actually sarcastic thing. f it. So yeah, it is a little out there for an article. But hey, it’s drawn a reaction, apparently.

  • Joe

    I’m gonna go out on a limb and guess that one of these applies to you:

    A. Recently dumped by a Scrippsie.
    B. Recently rejected by a Scrippsie.
    C. Recently lost an argument about feminism to a Scrippsie.
    D. All of the above.

    …because it definitely comes across as you being really bitter about something. Writing an article about an anthem change: okay. Writing a creepy, angry, 16-paragraph, borderline misogynistic rant about an anthem change: less okay.

  • S

    “In addition, what is empowering about the song? Getting hosed tonight? Dangg, Scripps. Way to stay classy.”

    You missed it, hun. He’s being sarcastic.

    And to the author: A Scripps education is not closed-minded and hypocritical, as you claim. I’m wondering where you got your data. For instance, you claim Scrippsies are taught “that only white males are racist” and that they “try to force all discourse through the lens of gender.” I am a Scripps student, and no class I’ve attended has ever operated under such outrageous pretenses. Furthermore, why in the hell WOULD “any self-respecting woman,” as you put it, be insulted by the Voice’s claim? A women’s college IS supposed to empower women. That’s why we’re here. There ARE disparities between how women learn at co-ed institutions and how they learn at all-women colleges. Sexism does still permeate society. It is not just an historical fact we need to overcome, it is a reality.

    Furthermore, I’m sure there are women on campus who extol healthy eating while starving themselves. But that kind of hypocrisy does not define a Scripps education and it does not define all Scripps women. The women who do operate that way have serious insecurities and need help. Be careful of making sweeping generalizations. They are dangerous and irresponsible.

    • B

      Haha, I didn’t miss it. But if he’d focus on what a rediculous anthem it was for Scripps, it would probably have received less criticism, since no one can argue how stupid it is, and ask what does it actually represent? Feminism? Really?

      • B

        Oops. Screw that all. I was writing that too early in the morning and missed the whole actually sarcastic thing. f it. So yeah, it is a little out there for an article. But hey, it’s drawn a reaction, apparently.

  • Proud Scrippsie

    I see the high incidence of eating disorders among Scrippsies as indicative not of hypocrisy, but of the fact that Scripps women, like all women (particularly college women), live in a world that continues to value them for their appearance as much as, if not more than, their character and intellect. This means that, try as we might to change our attitudes about our own bodies, we are still under pressure from the media, our friends, and men to look a certain way. Eating disorders are a form of mental illness, but it is heavily influenced by cultural messages. Mr. Atwater is criticizing Scripps women for what I see as simply trying to deal with a very difficult issue: how to transcend a value system that most of us were born into, have grown up in, and continue to live with.

  • Proud Scrippsie

    I see the high incidence of eating disorders among Scrippsies as indicative not of hypocrisy, but of the fact that Scripps women, like all women (particularly college women), live in a world that continues to value them for their appearance as much as, if not more than, their character and intellect. This means that, try as we might to change our attitudes about our own bodies, we are still under pressure from the media, our friends, and men to look a certain way. Eating disorders are a form of mental illness, but it is heavily influenced by cultural messages. Mr. Atwater is criticizing Scripps women for what I see as simply trying to deal with a very difficult issue: how to transcend a value system that most of us were born into, have grown up in, and continue to live with.

  • Proud Scrippsie

    I see the high incidence of eating disorders among Scrippsies as indicative not of hypocrisy, but of the fact that Scripps women, like all women (particularly college women), live in a world that continues to value them for their appearance as much as, if not more than, their character and intellect. This means that, try as we might to change our attitudes about our own bodies, we are still under pressure from the media, our friends, and men to look a certain way. Eating disorders are a form of mental illness, but it is heavily influenced by cultural messages. Mr. Atwater is criticizing Scripps women for what I see as simply trying to deal with a very difficult issue: how to transcend a value system that most of us were born into, have grown up in, and continue to live with.

  • S

    To “Proud Scrippsie”:

    You’re absolutely right. Excuse me for mis-speaking/writing.

  • S

    To “Proud Scrippsie”:

    You’re absolutely right. Excuse me for mis-speaking/writing.

  • S

    To “Proud Scrippsie”:

    You’re absolutely right. Excuse me for mis-speaking/writing.

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    I would curious to hear what background you have in feminist theory or feminist philosophy, Patrick. Your post doesn’t make mention of a specific feminist theory or ideology, but it puts Scripps under the giant umbrella of “feminist.” Whose definition of feminist are you using? Is it bell hooks’s definition (“a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression”) or Judith Butler’s more nuanced post-structuralist approach? Or is it some feminist theory that I have never heard of?

    • Dave

      props to Andrew for name-dropping bell hooks

      bring her (back) to the ath

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    I would curious to hear what background you have in feminist theory or feminist philosophy, Patrick. Your post doesn’t make mention of a specific feminist theory or ideology, but it puts Scripps under the giant umbrella of “feminist.” Whose definition of feminist are you using? Is it bell hooks’s definition (“a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression”) or Judith Butler’s more nuanced post-structuralist approach? Or is it some feminist theory that I have never heard of?

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    would be curious*

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    would be curious*

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    I would curious to hear what background you have in feminist theory or feminist philosophy, Patrick. Your post doesn’t make mention of a specific feminist theory or ideology, but it puts Scripps under the giant umbrella of “feminist.” Whose definition of feminist are you using? Is it bell hooks’s definition (“a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression”) or Judith Butler’s more nuanced post-structuralist approach? Or is it some feminist theory that I have never heard of?

    • Dave

      props to Andrew for name-dropping bell hooks

      bring her (back) to the ath

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    would be curious*

  • Rachael

    I’m not sure how you came to the conclusion that Scripps women believe that only white males are racist. Yes, history has largely been written by white men, but I think that the pushback against white male dominance is not solely the result of a “I hate men” or “white men are racist” mentality. Rather, it’s an attempt to expose Scripps students to an array of ideas from intellectuals who lie outside the “dead white men” category. Intercultural education is important, and Scripps would be doing its students a disservice by remaining canonical in its curricula.

    Secondly, why shouldn’t we fight against inequality with all we’ve got? Part of the problems inherent in today’s society — problems with racism, classism, educational inequity, etc — persist because not enough people fight with all they’ve got. You can’t claim to “understand” the situation of a historically oppressed group and then turn around and say that it’s not okay to fight for equality. That’s what feminism is: the idea that women are equal to men, not that women are better than men. I went to Scripps and I always appreciated having men in my class who expressed their point of view.

    Lastly, I used to be the Editor-in-Chief of voice; the newspaper still has a long way to go, but it’s come a long way in the past few years, especially considering that the staff doesn’t have its own office or all that many funds to begin with. Please don’t deride something that many women work very hard on — judging by the comments, people seem to find your article just as ridiculous as you seem to find the articles in voice.

  • Rachael

    I’m not sure how you came to the conclusion that Scripps women believe that only white males are racist. Yes, history has largely been written by white men, but I think that the pushback against white male dominance is not solely the result of a “I hate men” or “white men are racist” mentality. Rather, it’s an attempt to expose Scripps students to an array of ideas from intellectuals who lie outside the “dead white men” category. Intercultural education is important, and Scripps would be doing its students a disservice by remaining canonical in its curricula.

    Secondly, why shouldn’t we fight against inequality with all we’ve got? Part of the problems inherent in today’s society — problems with racism, classism, educational inequity, etc — persist because not enough people fight with all they’ve got. You can’t claim to “understand” the situation of a historically oppressed group and then turn around and say that it’s not okay to fight for equality. That’s what feminism is: the idea that women are equal to men, not that women are better than men. I went to Scripps and I always appreciated having men in my class who expressed their point of view.

    Lastly, I used to be the Editor-in-Chief of voice; the newspaper still has a long way to go, but it’s come a long way in the past few years, especially considering that the staff doesn’t have its own office or all that many funds to begin with. Please don’t deride something that many women work very hard on — judging by the comments, people seem to find your article just as ridiculous as you seem to find the articles in voice.

  • Rachael

    I’m not sure how you came to the conclusion that Scripps women believe that only white males are racist. Yes, history has largely been written by white men, but I think that the pushback against white male dominance is not solely the result of a “I hate men” or “white men are racist” mentality. Rather, it’s an attempt to expose Scripps students to an array of ideas from intellectuals who lie outside the “dead white men” category. Intercultural education is important, and Scripps would be doing its students a disservice by remaining canonical in its curricula.

    Secondly, why shouldn’t we fight against inequality with all we’ve got? Part of the problems inherent in today’s society — problems with racism, classism, educational inequity, etc — persist because not enough people fight with all they’ve got. You can’t claim to “understand” the situation of a historically oppressed group and then turn around and say that it’s not okay to fight for equality. That’s what feminism is: the idea that women are equal to men, not that women are better than men. I went to Scripps and I always appreciated having men in my class who expressed their point of view.

    Lastly, I used to be the Editor-in-Chief of voice; the newspaper still has a long way to go, but it’s come a long way in the past few years, especially considering that the staff doesn’t have its own office or all that many funds to begin with. Please don’t deride something that many women work very hard on — judging by the comments, people seem to find your article just as ridiculous as you seem to find the articles in voice.

  • Jane Farrell

    Beyond the stylistic deficiencies of your piece, there remains a completely unwarranted critique of a college you clearly know so little about alongside a wholly ignorant view of what feminism (and racism) mean and what being a feminist entails.

    I’m going to skip the first part where you reference a rather degrading song (that’s apparently meant to be funny) and cut right to the chase (my apologies ahead of time for such a lengthy response)
    1. What in the world compelled you to classify upwards of 900 women as victims of eating disorders?
    2. Have you ever set foot on Scripps’ campus or (heaven forbid!) entered a classroom? Please do so and you’ll understand why at least 75% of your article is completely off base. If you choose to take a class that falls under either “Women’s Studies” or even “Race and Ethnic Studies” you’ll figure out the other 25%.
    3. “Isn’t there something seriously wrong with the culture of Scripps?”
    –Nope, it’s just you!
    4. “It’s as if the college specializes in deterritorialization: universal concepts are everywhere stripped from their meaning and become free-floating injunctions. And I’m not the only one who sees this: [quote form Alicia Jenkins]
    –I disagree with Alicia and I think many Scripps women (please, no more of this diminutive “Scrippsies” nonsense) would too. Also, I don’t think Alicia’s statement backs up your point. “Universal concepts” rarely have universally agreed upon meanings (maybe you have skipped the humanities reqs at CMC or are saving them until last?) How, exactly, have they become “free floating injunctions”? A concept can command?
    5.”Consider the core of Scripps’ ideology: Feminism.”
    –Already been addressed above…
    6. “I always thought the underlying point of Feminism specifically (and the civil rights moment generally) was that you are supposed to judge people on “the content of their character, not [arbitrary things like] the color of their skin.” ”
    –Feminism (and anti-racism) are acknowledgments of the systemic and widespread history of oppression and discrimination against women (and, moreover, blacks) and the awareness that we must be conscious of this history and use it in shaping the understanding of our world.
    7. “Yet all too often at Scripps that ideal encapsulated in words like “Feminism” or “Freedom” is disconnected from its actual meaning and made to serve as a blunt reaction. If Scripps’ “Feminists” were really as committed to Feminism as it should be defined, they would be just as outraged at the discrepancy between the percentages of men and women going to higher education as they are about the wage gap.”
    –Again, I’d invite you take advantage of the incredible professors and students you have all over your campus to combat this ignorance. Also, please share with use how feminism “should” be defined.
    8. “In a sense, I think I can see where they’re coming from.”
    –Look! We’re making progress already!
    9. “You look at humanity’s recent history, and it’s dominated by white males.”
    –Well, sorry to break it to you, it’s not just recent history.
    10. “That history includes some pretty fucked up things, including the forced domestication of women.”
    –There are some really, really great books and classes available to read and attend. I’d be happy to provide references if you want some.
    11. “I imagine it’s easy to be consumed by the scope of that history and the magnitude of that blatant injustice. So consumed that you feel the need to fight it with everything you’ve got. That understandability, though, doesn’t make it ok.”
    –You’re absolutely right! Those silly blacks, gays, women and every other marginalized group should have resigned themselves to being second-class citizens for at least the remainder of the 21st century.
    12. “Far from it. Besides being simply wrong, the idea that only white males are racist is totalitarian. You’ve set up strict intellectual limits around something that delineate it completely. What’s racism? It’s the pejorative actions that white males take against other races. Oh, ok. I had no idea it was that simple. Neat-o.”
    –a. Where did you get the while male thing? Projecting much?
    b. Reading is good for you. Try it sometime.
    13. “Similarly it’s totalitarian to try to force all discourse through the lens of gender.”
    –Oh man, those scary feminists are definitely out to take over the world!
    14. “Our world is actually too complicated for that.”
    –You’re very right it’s complicated – complicated by things like sexism, racism, homophobia, Antisemitism, xenophobia…
    15. “Though I suppose, to be fair, if they’re feeling intellectually expansive, Scrippsies will include race and other historically underprivileged groups as means to valuable insight.”
    –We’ve been known to do so, yes.
    16. “Perversely, this shuttered way of thinking can come full circle and be detrimental to women’s rights.”
    –We’re the “shuttered” ones? You sure about that? Also, the paragraph after this excerpt does not demonstrate your second point.
    17. “Take the following quote…power?”
    –Someone else took care of that…
    18. “Or is it just that the girls that go to a women’s college are somehow weaker, need empowering?”
    –Oh please. And, FYI, women, not girls, go to women’s colleges.
    19. “Note too the immediate turn to Feminism.”
    –Heaven forbid!
    20. “Maybe that’s actually what’s needed in this case, but I can’t help but be cynical. As empowered, strong women, might the students of Scripps College need education in something other than their gender to combat this pernicious image consciousness. Like maybe the superego: stop fucking caring about what other people think.”
    –This is so problematic I don’t even know where to begin. Again, learn something (anything!) about Scripps before you write another piece on it. Next, “image consciousness” is not a problem we face and it’s not a matter of not caring about what other people think. An education that discusses feminist principles is about addressing the pernicious sexism in our society, the fact that history DOES matter when addressing inequities, and that an awareness of this (which you sorely lack) is the first step in achieving any semblance of equality. Women who elect to attend women’s colleges believe they will attain a greater understanding and grasp of this history.
    21. “There’s an eerily similarity between this Scripps’ ideology and Tyra Banks on her show America’s Next Top Model [excerpted from a post on More Intelligent Life, an Economist publication]:
    “And this is…possess.”
    –A similarity, I would argue, only you can see.
    22. “Can’t you picture Scrippsies doing the same song and dance, telling their friends to eat and be healthy, while simultaneously judging their every nutritional move in the cold war of calorie attrition? This weird ideology has claimed enough casualties. So I say enough of this mental Valium that they call wellness talks, enough of this femino-centric worldview, and enough of this cycle of bullshit generally. Scrippsies – like all budding young adults – need an education in how to live as responsible, productive, and fulfilled people, pure and simple. Feminism and wellness and all that other jazz they love up there can be a part of that, but just that: a part. Life demands and the Scripps young women deserve much more than this lame culture of broken ideals.”
    –The only “cycle of bullshit” I see is your closing argument.
    23. “(1) In the interest of full disclosure, I must confess: I read the Scripps Voice. I know, I know. But how else would I find gems like this?…Personally, I think every writer for the Scripps Voice secretly aspires to be a host on the View. But I digress.”
    Well at least the Voice would strongly encourage you not to publish such an embarrassingly naive and poorly researched piece like this. You’ve been digressing since you started writing.

    I respect freedom of speech, press, and a person’s right to share his or her opinion, but in the future please kindly take a look around before you do so. Scripps is far from perfect (I know this, I left after 3 semesters) but you are just undermining any kind of legitimate debate that could surround the validity of a women’s only education or Scripps as an institution.

    Someone just spent (or will spend) about 200,000 dollars on your education. Why don’t you try learning something about these aforementioned topics before leaving such an incredible college and resource like CMC?

  • Jane Farrell

    Beyond the stylistic deficiencies of your piece, there remains a completely unwarranted critique of a college you clearly know so little about alongside a wholly ignorant view of what feminism (and racism) mean and what being a feminist entails.

    I’m going to skip the first part where you reference a rather degrading song (that’s apparently meant to be funny) and cut right to the chase (my apologies ahead of time for such a lengthy response)
    1. What in the world compelled you to classify upwards of 900 women as victims of eating disorders?
    2. Have you ever set foot on Scripps’ campus or (heaven forbid!) entered a classroom? Please do so and you’ll understand why at least 75% of your article is completely off base. If you choose to take a class that falls under either “Women’s Studies” or even “Race and Ethnic Studies” you’ll figure out the other 25%.
    3. “Isn’t there something seriously wrong with the culture of Scripps?”
    –Nope, it’s just you!
    4. “It’s as if the college specializes in deterritorialization: universal concepts are everywhere stripped from their meaning and become free-floating injunctions. And I’m not the only one who sees this: [quote form Alicia Jenkins]
    –I disagree with Alicia and I think many Scripps women (please, no more of this diminutive “Scrippsies” nonsense) would too. Also, I don’t think Alicia’s statement backs up your point. “Universal concepts” rarely have universally agreed upon meanings (maybe you have skipped the humanities reqs at CMC or are saving them until last?) How, exactly, have they become “free floating injunctions”? A concept can command?
    5.”Consider the core of Scripps’ ideology: Feminism.”
    –Already been addressed above…
    6. “I always thought the underlying point of Feminism specifically (and the civil rights moment generally) was that you are supposed to judge people on “the content of their character, not [arbitrary things like] the color of their skin.” ”
    –Feminism (and anti-racism) are acknowledgments of the systemic and widespread history of oppression and discrimination against women (and, moreover, blacks) and the awareness that we must be conscious of this history and use it in shaping the understanding of our world.
    7. “Yet all too often at Scripps that ideal encapsulated in words like “Feminism” or “Freedom” is disconnected from its actual meaning and made to serve as a blunt reaction. If Scripps’ “Feminists” were really as committed to Feminism as it should be defined, they would be just as outraged at the discrepancy between the percentages of men and women going to higher education as they are about the wage gap.”
    –Again, I’d invite you take advantage of the incredible professors and students you have all over your campus to combat this ignorance. Also, please share with use how feminism “should” be defined.
    8. “In a sense, I think I can see where they’re coming from.”
    –Look! We’re making progress already!
    9. “You look at humanity’s recent history, and it’s dominated by white males.”
    –Well, sorry to break it to you, it’s not just recent history.
    10. “That history includes some pretty fucked up things, including the forced domestication of women.”
    –There are some really, really great books and classes available to read and attend. I’d be happy to provide references if you want some.
    11. “I imagine it’s easy to be consumed by the scope of that history and the magnitude of that blatant injustice. So consumed that you feel the need to fight it with everything you’ve got. That understandability, though, doesn’t make it ok.”
    –You’re absolutely right! Those silly blacks, gays, women and every other marginalized group should have resigned themselves to being second-class citizens for at least the remainder of the 21st century.
    12. “Far from it. Besides being simply wrong, the idea that only white males are racist is totalitarian. You’ve set up strict intellectual limits around something that delineate it completely. What’s racism? It’s the pejorative actions that white males take against other races. Oh, ok. I had no idea it was that simple. Neat-o.”
    –a. Where did you get the while male thing? Projecting much?
    b. Reading is good for you. Try it sometime.
    13. “Similarly it’s totalitarian to try to force all discourse through the lens of gender.”
    –Oh man, those scary feminists are definitely out to take over the world!
    14. “Our world is actually too complicated for that.”
    –You’re very right it’s complicated – complicated by things like sexism, racism, homophobia, Antisemitism, xenophobia…
    15. “Though I suppose, to be fair, if they’re feeling intellectually expansive, Scrippsies will include race and other historically underprivileged groups as means to valuable insight.”
    –We’ve been known to do so, yes.
    16. “Perversely, this shuttered way of thinking can come full circle and be detrimental to women’s rights.”
    –We’re the “shuttered” ones? You sure about that? Also, the paragraph after this excerpt does not demonstrate your second point.
    17. “Take the following quote…power?”
    –Someone else took care of that…
    18. “Or is it just that the girls that go to a women’s college are somehow weaker, need empowering?”
    –Oh please. And, FYI, women, not girls, go to women’s colleges.
    19. “Note too the immediate turn to Feminism.”
    –Heaven forbid!
    20. “Maybe that’s actually what’s needed in this case, but I can’t help but be cynical. As empowered, strong women, might the students of Scripps College need education in something other than their gender to combat this pernicious image consciousness. Like maybe the superego: stop fucking caring about what other people think.”
    –This is so problematic I don’t even know where to begin. Again, learn something (anything!) about Scripps before you write another piece on it. Next, “image consciousness” is not a problem we face and it’s not a matter of not caring about what other people think. An education that discusses feminist principles is about addressing the pernicious sexism in our society, the fact that history DOES matter when addressing inequities, and that an awareness of this (which you sorely lack) is the first step in achieving any semblance of equality. Women who elect to attend women’s colleges believe they will attain a greater understanding and grasp of this history.
    21. “There’s an eerily similarity between this Scripps’ ideology and Tyra Banks on her show America’s Next Top Model [excerpted from a post on More Intelligent Life, an Economist publication]:
    “And this is…possess.”
    –A similarity, I would argue, only you can see.
    22. “Can’t you picture Scrippsies doing the same song and dance, telling their friends to eat and be healthy, while simultaneously judging their every nutritional move in the cold war of calorie attrition? This weird ideology has claimed enough casualties. So I say enough of this mental Valium that they call wellness talks, enough of this femino-centric worldview, and enough of this cycle of bullshit generally. Scrippsies – like all budding young adults – need an education in how to live as responsible, productive, and fulfilled people, pure and simple. Feminism and wellness and all that other jazz they love up there can be a part of that, but just that: a part. Life demands and the Scripps young women deserve much more than this lame culture of broken ideals.”
    –The only “cycle of bullshit” I see is your closing argument.
    23. “(1) In the interest of full disclosure, I must confess: I read the Scripps Voice. I know, I know. But how else would I find gems like this?…Personally, I think every writer for the Scripps Voice secretly aspires to be a host on the View. But I digress.”
    Well at least the Voice would strongly encourage you not to publish such an embarrassingly naive and poorly researched piece like this. You’ve been digressing since you started writing.

    I respect freedom of speech, press, and a person’s right to share his or her opinion, but in the future please kindly take a look around before you do so. Scripps is far from perfect (I know this, I left after 3 semesters) but you are just undermining any kind of legitimate debate that could surround the validity of a women’s only education or Scripps as an institution.

    Someone just spent (or will spend) about 200,000 dollars on your education. Why don’t you try learning something about these aforementioned topics before leaving such an incredible college and resource like CMC?

    • DeusExMachina

      tl;dr

  • Jane Farrell

    Beyond the stylistic deficiencies of your piece, there remains a completely unwarranted critique of a college you clearly know so little about alongside a wholly ignorant view of what feminism (and racism) mean and what being a feminist entails.

    I’m going to skip the first part where you reference a rather degrading song (that’s apparently meant to be funny) and cut right to the chase (my apologies ahead of time for such a lengthy response)
    1. What in the world compelled you to classify upwards of 900 women as victims of eating disorders?
    2. Have you ever set foot on Scripps’ campus or (heaven forbid!) entered a classroom? Please do so and you’ll understand why at least 75% of your article is completely off base. If you choose to take a class that falls under either “Women’s Studies” or even “Race and Ethnic Studies” you’ll figure out the other 25%.
    3. “Isn’t there something seriously wrong with the culture of Scripps?”
    –Nope, it’s just you!
    4. “It’s as if the college specializes in deterritorialization: universal concepts are everywhere stripped from their meaning and become free-floating injunctions. And I’m not the only one who sees this: [quote form Alicia Jenkins]
    –I disagree with Alicia and I think many Scripps women (please, no more of this diminutive “Scrippsies” nonsense) would too. Also, I don’t think Alicia’s statement backs up your point. “Universal concepts” rarely have universally agreed upon meanings (maybe you have skipped the humanities reqs at CMC or are saving them until last?) How, exactly, have they become “free floating injunctions”? A concept can command?
    5.”Consider the core of Scripps’ ideology: Feminism.”
    –Already been addressed above…
    6. “I always thought the underlying point of Feminism specifically (and the civil rights moment generally) was that you are supposed to judge people on “the content of their character, not [arbitrary things like] the color of their skin.” ”
    –Feminism (and anti-racism) are acknowledgments of the systemic and widespread history of oppression and discrimination against women (and, moreover, blacks) and the awareness that we must be conscious of this history and use it in shaping the understanding of our world.
    7. “Yet all too often at Scripps that ideal encapsulated in words like “Feminism” or “Freedom” is disconnected from its actual meaning and made to serve as a blunt reaction. If Scripps’ “Feminists” were really as committed to Feminism as it should be defined, they would be just as outraged at the discrepancy between the percentages of men and women going to higher education as they are about the wage gap.”
    –Again, I’d invite you take advantage of the incredible professors and students you have all over your campus to combat this ignorance. Also, please share with use how feminism “should” be defined.
    8. “In a sense, I think I can see where they’re coming from.”
    –Look! We’re making progress already!
    9. “You look at humanity’s recent history, and it’s dominated by white males.”
    –Well, sorry to break it to you, it’s not just recent history.
    10. “That history includes some pretty fucked up things, including the forced domestication of women.”
    –There are some really, really great books and classes available to read and attend. I’d be happy to provide references if you want some.
    11. “I imagine it’s easy to be consumed by the scope of that history and the magnitude of that blatant injustice. So consumed that you feel the need to fight it with everything you’ve got. That understandability, though, doesn’t make it ok.”
    –You’re absolutely right! Those silly blacks, gays, women and every other marginalized group should have resigned themselves to being second-class citizens for at least the remainder of the 21st century.
    12. “Far from it. Besides being simply wrong, the idea that only white males are racist is totalitarian. You’ve set up strict intellectual limits around something that delineate it completely. What’s racism? It’s the pejorative actions that white males take against other races. Oh, ok. I had no idea it was that simple. Neat-o.”
    –a. Where did you get the while male thing? Projecting much?
    b. Reading is good for you. Try it sometime.
    13. “Similarly it’s totalitarian to try to force all discourse through the lens of gender.”
    –Oh man, those scary feminists are definitely out to take over the world!
    14. “Our world is actually too complicated for that.”
    –You’re very right it’s complicated – complicated by things like sexism, racism, homophobia, Antisemitism, xenophobia…
    15. “Though I suppose, to be fair, if they’re feeling intellectually expansive, Scrippsies will include race and other historically underprivileged groups as means to valuable insight.”
    –We’ve been known to do so, yes.
    16. “Perversely, this shuttered way of thinking can come full circle and be detrimental to women’s rights.”
    –We’re the “shuttered” ones? You sure about that? Also, the paragraph after this excerpt does not demonstrate your second point.
    17. “Take the following quote…power?”
    –Someone else took care of that…
    18. “Or is it just that the girls that go to a women’s college are somehow weaker, need empowering?”
    –Oh please. And, FYI, women, not girls, go to women’s colleges.
    19. “Note too the immediate turn to Feminism.”
    –Heaven forbid!
    20. “Maybe that’s actually what’s needed in this case, but I can’t help but be cynical. As empowered, strong women, might the students of Scripps College need education in something other than their gender to combat this pernicious image consciousness. Like maybe the superego: stop fucking caring about what other people think.”
    –This is so problematic I don’t even know where to begin. Again, learn something (anything!) about Scripps before you write another piece on it. Next, “image consciousness” is not a problem we face and it’s not a matter of not caring about what other people think. An education that discusses feminist principles is about addressing the pernicious sexism in our society, the fact that history DOES matter when addressing inequities, and that an awareness of this (which you sorely lack) is the first step in achieving any semblance of equality. Women who elect to attend women’s colleges believe they will attain a greater understanding and grasp of this history.
    21. “There’s an eerily similarity between this Scripps’ ideology and Tyra Banks on her show America’s Next Top Model [excerpted from a post on More Intelligent Life, an Economist publication]:
    “And this is…possess.”
    –A similarity, I would argue, only you can see.
    22. “Can’t you picture Scrippsies doing the same song and dance, telling their friends to eat and be healthy, while simultaneously judging their every nutritional move in the cold war of calorie attrition? This weird ideology has claimed enough casualties. So I say enough of this mental Valium that they call wellness talks, enough of this femino-centric worldview, and enough of this cycle of bullshit generally. Scrippsies – like all budding young adults – need an education in how to live as responsible, productive, and fulfilled people, pure and simple. Feminism and wellness and all that other jazz they love up there can be a part of that, but just that: a part. Life demands and the Scripps young women deserve much more than this lame culture of broken ideals.”
    –The only “cycle of bullshit” I see is your closing argument.
    23. “(1) In the interest of full disclosure, I must confess: I read the Scripps Voice. I know, I know. But how else would I find gems like this?…Personally, I think every writer for the Scripps Voice secretly aspires to be a host on the View. But I digress.”
    Well at least the Voice would strongly encourage you not to publish such an embarrassingly naive and poorly researched piece like this. You’ve been digressing since you started writing.

    I respect freedom of speech, press, and a person’s right to share his or her opinion, but in the future please kindly take a look around before you do so. Scripps is far from perfect (I know this, I left after 3 semesters) but you are just undermining any kind of legitimate debate that could surround the validity of a women’s only education or Scripps as an institution.

    Someone just spent (or will spend) about 200,000 dollars on your education. Why don’t you try learning something about these aforementioned topics before leaving such an incredible college and resource like CMC?

    • DeusExMachina

      tl;dr

  • Cara Daley

    Definitely thought this was a Stag Hen article at first. Carl? redux?

    • http://www.thestaghen.com Carl Peaslee

      Ha. I actually thought that for a second too.

      I was like, shit, did I just get scooped?

      Then I realized it was a incredibly controversial article that I would never write with a ten foot pen.

      But kudos to you Patrick for getting people riled up. You’re giving CJ a run for his money.

  • Patrick Atwater

    There’s a lot to respond to, but I want to be brief. So I’ll try to just address some of the more blatant strawman arguments:

    1) Not dumped by a Scripps women or otherwise maligned. I actually find most Scripps women–like most people generally–to be nice people. Sorry.

    2) I’m not trying to leverage CMC women’s distrust of Scripps women to “score points.” Sorry, Charles, I’m not that clever.

    2) I never said all Scripps students believed this. Nor did I say that every Scrippsy is a man-hating feminazi. That would be absurd. But I think its reasonable to speak of the general beliefs, tenets, presuppositions, etc. (i.e. ideology) that tend to define a place. Flipping the argument around, does anyone seriously believe that Scripps is not defined by being a womens college with femminist tendencies?

    3) I find Dave’s analogy to CMC interesting–because the school is clearly defined by our jockish, moneymaking reputation.

    4) More generally, I find it interesting that no one has actually argued against the thesis of the article: that Scripps’ brand of ideology is excessively and perversely certain. People have questioned whether I have had sufficient experience with Scripps to make that claim; people have asked about my feminist theory credentials; people have demanded data (as if there could be data that proves or disproves ); people have gone line by line and addressed my argument in and out of context (Jane I’m impressed); but no one has actually argued that point. They’ve just ranted about how I don’t understand the ideology or how it’s justified, which isn’t exactly the same thing.

  • Patrick Atwater

    There’s a lot to respond to, but I want to be brief. So I’ll try to just address some of the more blatant strawman arguments:

    1) Not dumped by a Scripps women or otherwise maligned. I actually find most Scripps women–like most people generally–to be nice people. Sorry.

    2) I’m not trying to leverage CMC women’s distrust of Scripps women to “score points.” Sorry, Charles, I’m not that clever.

    2) I never said all Scripps students believed this. Nor did I say that every Scrippsy is a man-hating feminazi. That would be absurd. But I think its reasonable to speak of the general beliefs, tenets, presuppositions, etc. (i.e. ideology) that tend to define a place. Flipping the argument around, does anyone seriously believe that Scripps is not defined by being a womens college with femminist tendencies?

    3) I find Dave’s analogy to CMC interesting–because the school is clearly defined by our jockish, moneymaking reputation.

    4) More generally, I find it interesting that no one has actually argued against the thesis of the article: that Scripps’ brand of ideology is excessively and perversely certain. People have questioned whether I have had sufficient experience with Scripps to make that claim; people have asked about my feminist theory credentials; people have demanded data (as if there could be data that proves or disproves ); people have gone line by line and addressed my argument in and out of context (Jane I’m impressed); but no one has actually argued that point. They’ve just ranted about how I don’t understand the ideology or how it’s justified, which isn’t exactly the same thing.

    • Dave

      Patrick-

      In defense of my CMC analogy, I would think that the 20% of students who don’t drink, along with the additional 20% who drink less than once every two weeks (those statistics are from Fid Castro) would resent being sterotyped as the heavy-drinking jocks that I drew a parallel to in my analogy. Even though I’m not one of them, I respect their decision (as I’m sure you do) and believe they have the right not to fall under the stereotype, just as I believe that the 99% of Scripps students who don’t suffer from eating disorders have the right not to fall under your broad generalizations.

      I think the large majority of CMCers that aren’t doing a Finance Sequence or interning with Goldman (and therefore don’t fit the ‘money-making’ stereotype) would agree with me that its unfair for “general beliefs, tenets, presuppositions” to define a place. Yes, Scripps is a WOMENS college. If there was even a shred of evidence in your article that you had even a somewhat rudimentary understanding of feminist theory, you would rethink how much actual “feminism” there is at Scripps.

      I’m a CMCer to the core. I live on Green Beach. I’ll be getting schwasted during 6:01. I straddle the line between jock-ish and preppy that it seems like only CMC students can achieve…yet I recognize the inherent value of gender studies, black studies, queer studies, asian studies, religious studies and every other marginalized set of values and beliefs to which you think Scripps wastes its time assigning importance. And thats what makes the Claremont Colleges a truly spectacular place for an education.

  • Patrick Atwater

    There’s a lot to respond to, but I want to be brief. So I’ll try to just address some of the more blatant strawman arguments:

    1) Not dumped by a Scripps women or otherwise maligned. I actually find most Scripps women–like most people generally–to be nice people. Sorry.

    2) I’m not trying to leverage CMC women’s distrust of Scripps women to “score points.” Sorry, Charles, I’m not that clever.

    2) I never said all Scripps students believed this. Nor did I say that every Scrippsy is a man-hating feminazi. That would be absurd. But I think its reasonable to speak of the general beliefs, tenets, presuppositions, etc. (i.e. ideology) that tend to define a place. Flipping the argument around, does anyone seriously believe that Scripps is not defined by being a womens college with femminist tendencies?

    3) I find Dave’s analogy to CMC interesting–because the school is clearly defined by our jockish, moneymaking reputation.

    4) More generally, I find it interesting that no one has actually argued against the thesis of the article: that Scripps’ brand of ideology is excessively and perversely certain. People have questioned whether I have had sufficient experience with Scripps to make that claim; people have asked about my feminist theory credentials; people have demanded data (as if there could be data that proves or disproves ); people have gone line by line and addressed my argument in and out of context (Jane I’m impressed); but no one has actually argued that point. They’ve just ranted about how I don’t understand the ideology or how it’s justified, which isn’t exactly the same thing.

    • Dave

      Patrick-

      In defense of my CMC analogy, I would think that the 20% of students who don’t drink, along with the additional 20% who drink less than once every two weeks (those statistics are from Fid Castro) would resent being sterotyped as the heavy-drinking jocks that I drew a parallel to in my analogy. Even though I’m not one of them, I respect their decision (as I’m sure you do) and believe they have the right not to fall under the stereotype, just as I believe that the 99% of Scripps students who don’t suffer from eating disorders have the right not to fall under your broad generalizations.

      I think the large majority of CMCers that aren’t doing a Finance Sequence or interning with Goldman (and therefore don’t fit the ‘money-making’ stereotype) would agree with me that its unfair for “general beliefs, tenets, presuppositions” to define a place. Yes, Scripps is a WOMENS college. If there was even a shred of evidence in your article that you had even a somewhat rudimentary understanding of feminist theory, you would rethink how much actual “feminism” there is at Scripps.

      I’m a CMCer to the core. I live on Green Beach. I’ll be getting schwasted during 6:01. I straddle the line between jock-ish and preppy that it seems like only CMC students can achieve…yet I recognize the inherent value of gender studies, black studies, queer studies, asian studies, religious studies and every other marginalized set of values and beliefs to which you think Scripps wastes its time assigning importance. And thats what makes the Claremont Colleges a truly spectacular place for an education.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    “Scripps’ brand of ideology is excessively and perversely certain”

    That makes no sense, Patrick. First you said Scripps’s ideology was “feminism.” Then at least all of the people posting on here agreed that it wasn’t. That much dissent about the actual ideology would therefore imply that the ideology is neither excessive nor perversely, but agreeably UNcertain.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    “Scripps’ brand of ideology is excessively and perversely certain”

    That makes no sense, Patrick. First you said Scripps’s ideology was “feminism.” Then at least all of the people posting on here agreed that it wasn’t. That much dissent about the actual ideology would therefore imply that the ideology is neither excessive nor perversely, but agreeably UNcertain.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    “Scripps’ brand of ideology is excessively and perversely certain”

    That makes no sense, Patrick. First you said Scripps’s ideology was “feminism.” Then at least all of the people posting on here agreed that it wasn’t. That much dissent about the actual ideology would therefore imply that the ideology is neither excessive nor perversely, but agreeably UNcertain.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    And the fact that no one responded to what you perceived to be your “main point” seems to point to the fact that despite all of your rambling, you failed to make one.

    • Groucho Marx

      agreed.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    And the fact that no one responded to what you perceived to be your “main point” seems to point to the fact that despite all of your rambling, you failed to make one.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    And the fact that no one responded to what you perceived to be your “main point” seems to point to the fact that despite all of your rambling, you failed to make one.

    • Groucho Marx

      agreed.

  • Proud Scrippsie

    As someone whose working definition of feminism is the belief that women are human beings worthy of equal rights and opportunities as men, I would say that Scripps does, in fact, embody the spirit of feminism. However, I don’t see a problem with this. Without the various feminist movements, women wouldn’t be in college, wouldn’t be able to vote, and wouldn’t be able to pursue an occupation of their choosing. Why are we so afraid of this progressive, egalitarian movement and ideology?

  • Proud Scrippsie

    As someone whose working definition of feminism is the belief that women are human beings worthy of equal rights and opportunities as men, I would say that Scripps does, in fact, embody the spirit of feminism. However, I don’t see a problem with this. Without the various feminist movements, women wouldn’t be in college, wouldn’t be able to vote, and wouldn’t be able to pursue an occupation of their choosing. Why are we so afraid of this progressive, egalitarian movement and ideology?

  • Proud Scrippsie

    As someone whose working definition of feminism is the belief that women are human beings worthy of equal rights and opportunities as men, I would say that Scripps does, in fact, embody the spirit of feminism. However, I don’t see a problem with this. Without the various feminist movements, women wouldn’t be in college, wouldn’t be able to vote, and wouldn’t be able to pursue an occupation of their choosing. Why are we so afraid of this progressive, egalitarian movement and ideology?

  • Ariel

    If you really do find most Scrippsies to be nice people, as you so claim, it confounds me why you would write, let alone publish, such a demeaning and disrespectful article. It’s obvious from your response that you don’t consider yourself to be making offensive generalizations, but it certainly comes off that way. Perhaps next time (which I honestly hope there isn’t) you’ll pay closer attention to how you approach your argument. You could have focused on the prevalence of eating disorders in Scripps women (not necessarily higher than on any other campus in Claremont or the nation) as distinctly “hypocritical” because of the atmosphere of supposed female empowerment. You might not have been right but you could have made a legitimate argument. Instead you seem to launch a full-scale assault on everything you deem wrong or misguided about Scripps, from Core to feminism to women’s colleges in general. To be honest, it’s closed-minded, insulting statements like the ones you make here that make me glad to be at a women’s college.

  • Ariel

    If you really do find most Scrippsies to be nice people, as you so claim, it confounds me why you would write, let alone publish, such a demeaning and disrespectful article. It’s obvious from your response that you don’t consider yourself to be making offensive generalizations, but it certainly comes off that way. Perhaps next time (which I honestly hope there isn’t) you’ll pay closer attention to how you approach your argument. You could have focused on the prevalence of eating disorders in Scripps women (not necessarily higher than on any other campus in Claremont or the nation) as distinctly “hypocritical” because of the atmosphere of supposed female empowerment. You might not have been right but you could have made a legitimate argument. Instead you seem to launch a full-scale assault on everything you deem wrong or misguided about Scripps, from Core to feminism to women’s colleges in general. To be honest, it’s closed-minded, insulting statements like the ones you make here that make me glad to be at a women’s college.

    • I don’t follow

      Does that mean that everyone at women’s colleges isn’t closed-minded or insulting? If that generalization is true, then please, sign me up.

      • Brian

        Well said, I don’t follow. Generalizations work both ways!

      • Ariel

        Women that go to women’s college are generally not closed minded and insulting ABOUT women’s colleges. Oh hey, a generalization that makes PERFECT sense!

        And seriously, I haven’t met a Scrippsie here who is closed-minded and insulting. Not to say they don’t exist, but from my personal experience.

      • Brian

        Well, @ Ariel, you said that “it’s such close-minded, insulting statements that make you glad to be at a women’s college”. Maybe you should clarify further. Not all of us mind read, but I guess that’s a common assumption that we do.

        And your personal experience is either blinded or severely limited. I’ve seen many shallow, close-minded, ignorant Scrippsies. Being at a women’s college doesn’t make those traits any more or less common in the general population, though I hate to be the bearer of bad news.

  • Ariel

    If you really do find most Scrippsies to be nice people, as you so claim, it confounds me why you would write, let alone publish, such a demeaning and disrespectful article. It’s obvious from your response that you don’t consider yourself to be making offensive generalizations, but it certainly comes off that way. Perhaps next time (which I honestly hope there isn’t) you’ll pay closer attention to how you approach your argument. You could have focused on the prevalence of eating disorders in Scripps women (not necessarily higher than on any other campus in Claremont or the nation) as distinctly “hypocritical” because of the atmosphere of supposed female empowerment. You might not have been right but you could have made a legitimate argument. Instead you seem to launch a full-scale assault on everything you deem wrong or misguided about Scripps, from Core to feminism to women’s colleges in general. To be honest, it’s closed-minded, insulting statements like the ones you make here that make me glad to be at a women’s college.

    • I don’t follow

      Does that mean that everyone at women’s colleges isn’t closed-minded or insulting? If that generalization is true, then please, sign me up.

      • Brian

        Well said, I don’t follow. Generalizations work both ways!

      • Ariel

        Women that go to women’s college are generally not closed minded and insulting ABOUT women’s colleges. Oh hey, a generalization that makes PERFECT sense!

        And seriously, I haven’t met a Scrippsie here who is closed-minded and insulting. Not to say they don’t exist, but from my personal experience.

      • Brian

        Well, @ Ariel, you said that “it’s such close-minded, insulting statements that make you glad to be at a women’s college”. Maybe you should clarify further. Not all of us mind read, but I guess that’s a common assumption that we do.

        And your personal experience is either blinded or severely limited. I’ve seen many shallow, close-minded, ignorant Scrippsies. Being at a women’s college doesn’t make those traits any more or less common in the general population, though I hate to be the bearer of bad news.

  • A Challenge

    On the subject of double standards, I challenge the straight men of CMC to examine their own standards of beauty. How many male friends do you have who are dating women who wear size 10 jeans? 12? 14? How many are dating women who are a little too thin? Now, how many of them would say that they want the women they know to have healthy body images and eat healthily? How many of these men hang images of models (with an average height of 5’7″ and an average weight of 115, a good deal taller and thinner than the average “real” woman) in their rooms?

    Don’t blame only the women for being trapped in an increasingly “skinny” culture with high demands on our bodies and our time. Remember that the men are involved: sometimes complicit, but always just as trapped. Go write an article about that.

  • A Challenge

    On the subject of double standards, I challenge the straight men of CMC to examine their own standards of beauty. How many male friends do you have who are dating women who wear size 10 jeans? 12? 14? How many are dating women who are a little too thin? Now, how many of them would say that they want the women they know to have healthy body images and eat healthily? How many of these men hang images of models (with an average height of 5’7″ and an average weight of 115, a good deal taller and thinner than the average “real” woman) in their rooms?

    Don’t blame only the women for being trapped in an increasingly “skinny” culture with high demands on our bodies and our time. Remember that the men are involved: sometimes complicit, but always just as trapped. Go write an article about that.

  • A Challenge

    On the subject of double standards, I challenge the straight men of CMC to examine their own standards of beauty. How many male friends do you have who are dating women who wear size 10 jeans? 12? 14? How many are dating women who are a little too thin? Now, how many of them would say that they want the women they know to have healthy body images and eat healthily? How many of these men hang images of models (with an average height of 5’7″ and an average weight of 115, a good deal taller and thinner than the average “real” woman) in their rooms?

    Don’t blame only the women for being trapped in an increasingly “skinny” culture with high demands on our bodies and our time. Remember that the men are involved: sometimes complicit, but always just as trapped. Go write an article about that.

  • Patrick Atwater

    Re: I go to Scripps and I eat and Proud Scrippsie

    Perhaps it would be helpful if I contextualized my argument in terms of yours. Consider the name “I go to Scripps and I eat.” Now what purpose does that serve outside of being bombastic? It’s not like the important divide in this discussion is between people who think Scripps women eat and those that don’t. That sort of vitriol combined with the blind confidence with which you assert your conclusion is exactly the sort of thing I’m critiquing.

    Proud Scrippsie, I think you misunderstand my point. That’s probably my fault. Maybe I do value precision in language too much. But I digress. And ramble, apparently. Anyway, I agree with you that Scripps women are “trying to deal with a very difficult issue: how to transcend a value system that most of us were born into, have grown up in, and continue to live with.” No matter how compelling a deterministic argument you make, I think the more pressing question is what belief will actually help Scipps women live their lives: that their decisions are a product of society and beyond their control or that they are responsible for their decisions. Clearly this is a bit of a false dichotomy, but I think that at the end of the day if people don’t think they’re ultimately responsible for their actions and in charge of their lives, they’re going to have shitty lives.

    I also agree with much of your second post. It is a source of great pride that my grandmother was one of the pioneering women to go to Berkley. You then ask: “Why are we so afraid of this progressive, egalitarian movement and ideology?” It’s not that I’m afraid of Feminism per say–just that I worry about it being misappropriated. I hope that helps.

  • Patrick Atwater

    Re: I go to Scripps and I eat and Proud Scrippsie

    Perhaps it would be helpful if I contextualized my argument in terms of yours. Consider the name “I go to Scripps and I eat.” Now what purpose does that serve outside of being bombastic? It’s not like the important divide in this discussion is between people who think Scripps women eat and those that don’t. That sort of vitriol combined with the blind confidence with which you assert your conclusion is exactly the sort of thing I’m critiquing.

    Proud Scrippsie, I think you misunderstand my point. That’s probably my fault. Maybe I do value precision in language too much. But I digress. And ramble, apparently. Anyway, I agree with you that Scripps women are “trying to deal with a very difficult issue: how to transcend a value system that most of us were born into, have grown up in, and continue to live with.” No matter how compelling a deterministic argument you make, I think the more pressing question is what belief will actually help Scipps women live their lives: that their decisions are a product of society and beyond their control or that they are responsible for their decisions. Clearly this is a bit of a false dichotomy, but I think that at the end of the day if people don’t think they’re ultimately responsible for their actions and in charge of their lives, they’re going to have shitty lives.

    I also agree with much of your second post. It is a source of great pride that my grandmother was one of the pioneering women to go to Berkley. You then ask: “Why are we so afraid of this progressive, egalitarian movement and ideology?” It’s not that I’m afraid of Feminism per say–just that I worry about it being misappropriated. I hope that helps.

  • Patrick Atwater

    Re: I go to Scripps and I eat and Proud Scrippsie

    Perhaps it would be helpful if I contextualized my argument in terms of yours. Consider the name “I go to Scripps and I eat.” Now what purpose does that serve outside of being bombastic? It’s not like the important divide in this discussion is between people who think Scripps women eat and those that don’t. That sort of vitriol combined with the blind confidence with which you assert your conclusion is exactly the sort of thing I’m critiquing.

    Proud Scrippsie, I think you misunderstand my point. That’s probably my fault. Maybe I do value precision in language too much. But I digress. And ramble, apparently. Anyway, I agree with you that Scripps women are “trying to deal with a very difficult issue: how to transcend a value system that most of us were born into, have grown up in, and continue to live with.” No matter how compelling a deterministic argument you make, I think the more pressing question is what belief will actually help Scipps women live their lives: that their decisions are a product of society and beyond their control or that they are responsible for their decisions. Clearly this is a bit of a false dichotomy, but I think that at the end of the day if people don’t think they’re ultimately responsible for their actions and in charge of their lives, they’re going to have shitty lives.

    I also agree with much of your second post. It is a source of great pride that my grandmother was one of the pioneering women to go to Berkley. You then ask: “Why are we so afraid of this progressive, egalitarian movement and ideology?” It’s not that I’m afraid of Feminism per say–just that I worry about it being misappropriated. I hope that helps.

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    I questioned your feminist theory credentials because you have not yet explained what ideology you see to be pervasive at Scripps. If it is a “feminist” ideology, then I would be curious to know how you define that. I guess is that your “precise language” wouldn’t do the many types of feminism justice is you haven’t had any academic experience with gender studies.

    • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

      This is too funny to address seriously.

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    I questioned your feminist theory credentials because you have not yet explained what ideology you see to be pervasive at Scripps. If it is a “feminist” ideology, then I would be curious to know how you define that. I guess is that your “precise language” wouldn’t do the many types of feminism justice is you haven’t had any academic experience with gender studies.

  • Scripps 2010

    I don’t even understand how the so-called elected Scripps anthem “Just Dance” has anything to do with the rest of this article, in which you talk about howl Scripps women have eating disorders even though they press feminism, or whatever the hell you are actually saying.

    By the way, why wasn’t I in on this poll? I totally would have voted for “I Will Survive” or “Dancing Queen” or hell, even “Take It Off”. This was an unfair poll because I didn’t even know about it. That’s all I’m saying. Haha.

  • Scripps 2010

    I don’t even understand how the so-called elected Scripps anthem “Just Dance” has anything to do with the rest of this article, in which you talk about howl Scripps women have eating disorders even though they press feminism, or whatever the hell you are actually saying.

    By the way, why wasn’t I in on this poll? I totally would have voted for “I Will Survive” or “Dancing Queen” or hell, even “Take It Off”. This was an unfair poll because I didn’t even know about it. That’s all I’m saying. Haha.

  • http://claremontportside.com Andrew Bluebond

    I questioned your feminist theory credentials because you have not yet explained what ideology you see to be pervasive at Scripps. If it is a “feminist” ideology, then I would be curious to know how you define that. I guess is that your “precise language” wouldn’t do the many types of feminism justice is you haven’t had any academic experience with gender studies.

    • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

      This is too funny to address seriously.

  • Scripps 2010

    I don’t even understand how the so-called elected Scripps anthem “Just Dance” has anything to do with the rest of this article, in which you talk about howl Scripps women have eating disorders even though they press feminism, or whatever the hell you are actually saying.

    By the way, why wasn’t I in on this poll? I totally would have voted for “I Will Survive” or “Dancing Queen” or hell, even “Take It Off”. This was an unfair poll because I didn’t even know about it. That’s all I’m saying. Haha.

  • Scripps 2010

    *how

  • Scripps 2010

    *how

  • Evan

    I feel like you were attempting to spark some kind of intelligent discussion with this article. Problem is, any intelligent person reading it would not really have much to say to you. If I decided to forcefully maintain that 3+3 equaled 10, then despite any amount of rage, or use of flowery (to-the-point-of-being-amateur-ish) language, no fully informed individual would take my side.
    A good opinion piece introduces a fully valid and well-formed view and presents it as an informed alternative to what someone else might be thinking. Sadly here, you don’t even begin to disguise the fact that some event in your life, or some twisted personal sense of ineptitude has created a completely irrational–or at least entirely exaggerated negative feeling toward women. This was not a well-written opinion piece. This was some strange expression of bitterness which would have better served you (and the world) in your (very) personal diary. This was you masturbating your damaged, beaten, and emasculated ego as your mind tried desperately to activate some failing defense mechanism. Or hell, maybe it was just you masturbating–cause it seems like the consensus here is that no one else is doing that for you these days.
    Recommendation: Let this simmer down, wait a few years til no one remembers you wrote this, and try to actually meet a Scripps woman. You’ll find that, almost without exception, each and every one of them is more impressive than you could ever be.

    • Stephanie

      AMEN Evan. Clearly masturbatory babble.

  • Evan

    I feel like you were attempting to spark some kind of intelligent discussion with this article. Problem is, any intelligent person reading it would not really have much to say to you. If I decided to forcefully maintain that 3+3 equaled 10, then despite any amount of rage, or use of flowery (to-the-point-of-being-amateur-ish) language, no fully informed individual would take my side.
    A good opinion piece introduces a fully valid and well-formed view and presents it as an informed alternative to what someone else might be thinking. Sadly here, you don’t even begin to disguise the fact that some event in your life, or some twisted personal sense of ineptitude has created a completely irrational–or at least entirely exaggerated negative feeling toward women. This was not a well-written opinion piece. This was some strange expression of bitterness which would have better served you (and the world) in your (very) personal diary. This was you masturbating your damaged, beaten, and emasculated ego as your mind tried desperately to activate some failing defense mechanism. Or hell, maybe it was just you masturbating–cause it seems like the consensus here is that no one else is doing that for you these days.
    Recommendation: Let this simmer down, wait a few years til no one remembers you wrote this, and try to actually meet a Scripps woman. You’ll find that, almost without exception, each and every one of them is more impressive than you could ever be.

    • Stephanie

      AMEN Evan. Clearly masturbatory babble.

  • Recent Scripps Grad

    I find it astonishing that a CMC student who has never experienced Scripps’ Core feels so confident in asserting what it, and Scripps in general, is really about. When it’s obvious to me and many others who’ve actually completed said Core curriculum that you really, really don’t have the first idea what you’re talking about. Oh, and Core, like all programs at Scripps, and like feminism itself, is hardly the monolithic entity you’ve made it out to be. Yes, imagine that. Scripps students and professors are not all like-minded bees in a hive. For someone who claims to value “precision in language,” you’re not doing a very good job at being precise. How are you defining “feminism”? What’s the “misappropriation” of feminism? Etc. If people are “missing the point,” perhaps it is because you have expressed your “points” so incoherently.

  • Recent Scripps Grad

    I find it astonishing that a CMC student who has never experienced Scripps’ Core feels so confident in asserting what it, and Scripps in general, is really about. When it’s obvious to me and many others who’ve actually completed said Core curriculum that you really, really don’t have the first idea what you’re talking about. Oh, and Core, like all programs at Scripps, and like feminism itself, is hardly the monolithic entity you’ve made it out to be. Yes, imagine that. Scripps students and professors are not all like-minded bees in a hive. For someone who claims to value “precision in language,” you’re not doing a very good job at being precise. How are you defining “feminism”? What’s the “misappropriation” of feminism? Etc. If people are “missing the point,” perhaps it is because you have expressed your “points” so incoherently.

  • http://www.thestaghen.com Carl Peaslee

    Ha. I actually thought that for a second too.

    I was like, shit, did I just get scooped?

    Then I realized it was a incredibly controversial article that I would never write with a ten foot pen.

    But kudos to you Patrick for getting people riled up. You’re giving CJ a run for his money.

  • Pingback: Pitzer Uncovered » Blog Archive » A Mindless Rant from the CMC Forum()

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    Way to not address my point. Anyways, my name is supposed to be a joke. You know, like those bumper stickers, “I like dogs and I vote.” As in, the two have NOTHING to do with one another.

  • I Go To Scripps and I Eat

    Way to not address my point. Anyways, my name is supposed to be a joke. You know, like those bumper stickers, “I like dogs and I vote.” As in, the two have NOTHING to do with one another.

  • lady gaga

    I’ve had a little bit too much
    All of the people start to rush.
    Start to rush babe.
    How does he twist the dance?
    Can’t find my drink or man.
    Where are my keys, I lost my phone.
    What’s go-ing out on the floor?
    I love this record baby, but I can’t see straight anymore.
    Keep it cool what’s the name of this club?
    I can’t remember but it’s alright, alright.

    First of all, that sounds more like a typical CMC partier, if we are going to generalize.

    Secondly, almost every argument you applied towards Scripps women could just as easily be applied to CMC and the other colleges. The only unique argument I can see is that perhaps, since Scripps has gender studies classes as a GE/Core, they should be held to a higher standard but that argument is misleading and impractical . Everyone at the 5Cs is educated enough to be held to the same standard when gender is concerned. If this article was a rant against the backhanded compliments and social hierarchy often carried out by women, then there might be some merit. But since you targeted this towards Scripps, when the same hierarchies and backhanded compliments occur at CMC in particular, and at the other 4Cs, it takes away from any argument you had. And I don’t consider this a gender related issue. Men have the same hierarchical system and backhanded compliments. Men may not judge as often on calories, but they do judge other men in many ways. Whether it is the quantity or quality of sexual partners other men have, or the drugs they’ve done/do, or the job they have and the income they provide. Instead of focusing on illustrating these hierarchies and unnecessary judgments, you decided to rant on Scripps and the Voice.

  • lady gaga

    I’ve had a little bit too much
    All of the people start to rush.
    Start to rush babe.
    How does he twist the dance?
    Can’t find my drink or man.
    Where are my keys, I lost my phone.
    What’s go-ing out on the floor?
    I love this record baby, but I can’t see straight anymore.
    Keep it cool what’s the name of this club?
    I can’t remember but it’s alright, alright.

    First of all, that sounds more like a typical CMC partier, if we are going to generalize.

    Secondly, almost every argument you applied towards Scripps women could just as easily be applied to CMC and the other colleges. The only unique argument I can see is that perhaps, since Scripps has gender studies classes as a GE/Core, they should be held to a higher standard but that argument is misleading and impractical . Everyone at the 5Cs is educated enough to be held to the same standard when gender is concerned. If this article was a rant against the backhanded compliments and social hierarchy often carried out by women, then there might be some merit. But since you targeted this towards Scripps, when the same hierarchies and backhanded compliments occur at CMC in particular, and at the other 4Cs, it takes away from any argument you had. And I don’t consider this a gender related issue. Men have the same hierarchical system and backhanded compliments. Men may not judge as often on calories, but they do judge other men in many ways. Whether it is the quantity or quality of sexual partners other men have, or the drugs they’ve done/do, or the job they have and the income they provide. Instead of focusing on illustrating these hierarchies and unnecessary judgments, you decided to rant on Scripps and the Voice.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insec

    Patrick, has this become a question of pride with you? Are you afraid of admitting anything you said was wrong? Obviously very few of your readers have agreed with your supposed “point,” and those who have have done so unintelligently. I hope, whether or not you reveal it publicly, you have or will take the time to truly consider the responses on this page.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insecure

    Patrick, has this become a question of pride with you? Are you afraid of admitting anything you said was wrong? Obviously very few of your readers have agreed with your supposed “point,” and those who have have done so unintelligently. I hope, whether or not you reveal it publicly, you have or will take the time to truly consider the responses on this page.

  • http://None Lance Moore

    I am a current CMC student and after reading this article and observing the comments of fellow 5Cer’s, I have come to the following 9 conclusions: Now remember that these are all facts and I’m merely stating the obvious so please don’t shoot the messenger…

    1) I applaud Patrick Atwater for his attempt at an opinion piece, but it’s clear he took a few too many english classes in highschool and is now trying to use words he doesn’t completely understand.

    2) If anyone knows Patrick Atwater personally (like I do), they can atest to his being rejected by both Scripps AND cmc girls on a very very regular basis. So when he claims he hasn’t been dumped recently by a Scrippsie (Scrippser?) he is technically being honest, but he is also definitely skewing the facts. You’ll find Pat alone on most weekend nights hugging the wall in a NQ dance party with his hands innapropriately in his pockets rocking out awkwardly to Katy Perry.

    3) Although Charles Johnson looks like he’s straight out of “Gremlins” and/or Milton from “OfficeSpace”, he was actually inoffensive in his response to this post and I am beginning to tolerate him. Check out his blog at ClaremontConservative.blogspot.com.

    4) Shoutout to my girl Zoe Larkins.

    5) It pains me to say it since I am a CMC guy, but the majority of Scripps girls are far superior to CMC girls. Of course that statement does NOT include the group of Scripps girls who roam the CMC campus spreading venereal disease like the plague. Words of wisdom to CMC freshman, unless you want a treatable yet non curable condition, avoid any female with the initials SH. She’s nice and mildly attractive but you need to think long term! Trust me guys I’ve been there, and now once a month I’m there again and again….

    6) Fine fine fine, CMC girls are legit too. Disregard Post #5. It’s a tie, I love you all.

    7) Imagine the coolest guy you know. He’s probably smart, charming, good looking, athletic or artistic (not to be confused with autistic, although that’s ok too), has a lot of friends, girls like him, guys want to be him, etc…Well, Patrick Atwater is the exact opposite, which unfortunately makes it hard to value his opinion. He’s very mediocre all around and guys don’t want to be him, he wants guys to be IN him.

    8) All of the 5Cs are great educational institutions in the grand scheme of things (yes, even Pitzer). We all just need to relax a little bit. I could care less about the idealogy of Scripps; I don’t go there. It’s kind of weird for you to get so heated over it too. Let them do what they want. They’ve educated thousands of incredibly bright, smart, talented, and empowered women who have gone on or will go on to do great things in life, so they must be doing something right. Plus at least they aren’t Pomona. But seriously man, it’s weird and innapropriate for you to be writing/generalizing about the eating habits of individuals you’ve never met, so chill the fuck out.

    9) I anticipate one person will make an ill-fated attempt at humor by insulting me or arguing against these “truths”. Who will be the first to try?

    Thanks for your time and have a good year everybody! See you at Burrito night!

    • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

      @Lance Moore,

      I resent how people always find the need to make some kind of snide remark about either 1) my hair color or 2) my glasses — such as when our esteemed censor-in-chief remarked that I was pudgy and “questionably evil.” (He had it inverted. I’m questionably pudgy and downright evil.)

      But thankfully, Lance has done me a favor, by comparing me to the greatest movie character of all time — “Milton.” Remember friends, that Milton wins out in the end sipping his admittedly fruity drinks on an island with the money that others stole on his behalf!

      Alas, the Milton look is soon to fade as I’ve booked an appointment to get contacts at the cheapest place around: Cosco’s.

      Perhaps when my eyesight is better, I won’t have to stumble around without my after a night of listening to Lady Gaga (or that I love College song), searching for my phone, wondering, oh wondering . . .

      …If anyone has seen my stapler.

      • Brian

        Charles, on the contacts note, can you just call cosco and schedule an appointment to get them fitted?

    • Joe

      Great rebuttal, or greatest rebuttal? Especially #2. Ouch.

  • wow.

    If I didn’t know you, I’d say you were a misogynist who can’t write.

    • DeusExMachina

      As long as we’re handing out judgment on strangers based on a short writing sample, I’m going to assume you don’t have many friends and spend most of your nights alone wishing you had more legitimate emotional connection to your peers.

      This game is fun.

      • ex deus machina

        Hyperbole is fun. I’m going to assume you don’t have many friends and spend most of your nights alone wishing you had more legitimate emotional connection, WTF is emotional connection?-

        Is it fun being an internet tough guy? Is it not as much fun to poke fun at wow in person? Or is it just easier when there aren’t any consequences?

  • wow.

    If I didn’t know you, I’d say you were a misogynist who can’t write.

    • DeusExMachina

      As long as we’re handing out judgment on strangers based on a short writing sample, I’m going to assume you don’t have many friends and spend most of your nights alone wishing you had more legitimate emotional connection to your peers.

      This game is fun.

      • ex deus machina

        Hyperbole is fun. I’m going to assume you don’t have many friends and spend most of your nights alone wishing you had more legitimate emotional connection, WTF is emotional connection?-

        Is it fun being an internet tough guy? Is it not as much fun to poke fun at wow in person? Or is it just easier when there aren’t any consequences?

  • http://None Lance Moore

    O c’mon you’re not going to display my comment? I had some valid points!

  • Top Ten List

    I am a current CMC student and after reading this article and observing the comments of fellow 5Cer’s, I have come to the following 10 conclusions: Now remember that these are all facts and I’m merely stating the obvious so please don’t shoot the messenger…

    1) I applaud Patrick Atwater for his attempt at an opinion piece, but it’s clear he took a few too many english classes in highschool and is now trying to use words he doesn’t completely understand.

    2) If anyone knows Patrick Atwater personally (like I do), they can atest to his being rejected by both Scripps AND cmc girls on a very very regular basis. So when he claims he hasn’t been dumped recently by a Scrippsie (Scrippser?) he is technically being honest, but he is also definitely skewing the facts. You’ll find Pat alone on most weekend nights hugging the wall in a NQ dance party with his hands innapropriately in his pockets rocking out awkwardly to Katy Perry.

    3) Although Charles Johnson looks like he’s straight out of “Gremlins” and/or Milton from “OfficeSpace”, he was actually inoffensive in his response to this post and I am beginning to tolerate him. Check out his blog at ClaremontConservative.blogspot.com.

    4) Shoutout to my girl Zoe Larkins.

    5) It pains me to say it since I am a CMC guy, but the majority of Scripps girls are far superior to CMC girls. Of course that statement does NOT include the group of Scripps girls who roam the CMC campus spreading venereal disease like the plague. Words of wisdom to CMC freshman, unless you want a treatable yet non curable condition, avoid any female with the initials SH. She’s nice and mildly attractive but you need to think long term! Trust me guys I’ve been there, and now once a month I’m there again and again….

    6) Fine fine fine, CMC girls are legit too. Disregard Post #5. It’s a tie, I love you all.

    7) Imagine the coolest guy you know. He’s probably smart, charming, good looking, athletic or artistic (not to be confused with autistic, although that’s ok too), has a lot of friends, girls like him, guys want to be him, etc…Well, Patrick Atwater is the exact opposite, which unfortunately makes it hard to value his opinion. He’s very mediocre all around and guys don’t want to be him, he wants guys to be IN him.

    8 ) All of the 5Cs are great educational institutions in the grand scheme of things (yes, even Pitzer). We all just need to relax a little bit. I could care less about the idealogy of Scripps; I don’t go there. It’s kind of weird for you to get so heated over it too. Let them do what they want. They’ve educated thousands of incredibly bright, smart, talented, and empowered women who have gone on or will go on to do great things in life, so they must be doing something right. Plus at least they aren’t Pomona. But seriously man, it’s weird and innapropriate for you to be writing/generalizing about the eating habits of individuals you’ve never met, so chill the hell out.

    9) I anticipate one person will make an ill-fated attempt at humor by insulting me or arguing against these “truths”. Who will be the first to try?

    10) Thanks for your time and have a good year everybody! See you at Burrito night!

    • DeusExMachina

      “1) I applaud Patrick Atwater for his attempt at an opinion piece, but it’s clear he took a few too many english classes in highschool and is now trying to use words he doesn’t completely understand.

      2) If anyone knows Patrick Atwater personally (like I do), they can atest to his being rejected by both Scripps AND cmc girls on a very very regular basis. So when he claims he hasn’t been dumped recently by a Scrippsie (Scrippser?) he is technically being honest, but he is also definitely skewing the facts. You’ll find Pat alone on most weekend nights hugging the wall in a NQ dance party with his hands innapropriately in his pockets rocking out awkwardly to Katy Perry.”

      Hyperbole is fun. You’re most likely to find Patrick–WTF is Pat?–on a weekend night alone in his room, reading airy-fairy crap like Simulacra and Simulation, without having taken a shower.

      Is it fun being an internet tough guy? Is it not as much fun to poke fun at Patrick in person? Or is it just easier when there aren’t any consequences?

  • Top Ten List

    I am a current CMC student and after reading this article and observing the comments of fellow 5Cer’s, I have come to the following 10 conclusions: Now remember that these are all facts and I’m merely stating the obvious so please don’t shoot the messenger…

    1) I applaud Patrick Atwater for his attempt at an opinion piece, but it’s clear he took a few too many english classes in highschool and is now trying to use words he doesn’t completely understand.

    2) If anyone knows Patrick Atwater personally (like I do), they can atest to his being rejected by both Scripps AND cmc girls on a very very regular basis. So when he claims he hasn’t been dumped recently by a Scrippsie (Scrippser?) he is technically being honest, but he is also definitely skewing the facts. You’ll find Pat alone on most weekend nights hugging the wall in a NQ dance party with his hands innapropriately in his pockets rocking out awkwardly to Katy Perry.

    3) Although Charles Johnson looks like he’s straight out of “Gremlins” and/or Milton from “OfficeSpace”, he was actually inoffensive in his response to this post and I am beginning to tolerate him. Check out his blog at ClaremontConservative.blogspot.com.

    4) Shoutout to my girl Zoe Larkins.

    5) It pains me to say it since I am a CMC guy, but the majority of Scripps girls are far superior to CMC girls. Of course that statement does NOT include the group of Scripps girls who roam the CMC campus spreading venereal disease like the plague. Words of wisdom to CMC freshman, unless you want a treatable yet non curable condition, avoid any female with the initials SH. She’s nice and mildly attractive but you need to think long term! Trust me guys I’ve been there, and now once a month I’m there again and again….

    6) Fine fine fine, CMC girls are legit too. Disregard Post #5. It’s a tie, I love you all.

    7) Imagine the coolest guy you know. He’s probably smart, charming, good looking, athletic or artistic (not to be confused with autistic, although that’s ok too), has a lot of friends, girls like him, guys want to be him, etc…Well, Patrick Atwater is the exact opposite, which unfortunately makes it hard to value his opinion. He’s very mediocre all around and guys don’t want to be him, he wants guys to be IN him.

    8 ) All of the 5Cs are great educational institutions in the grand scheme of things (yes, even Pitzer). We all just need to relax a little bit. I could care less about the idealogy of Scripps; I don’t go there. It’s kind of weird for you to get so heated over it too. Let them do what they want. They’ve educated thousands of incredibly bright, smart, talented, and empowered women who have gone on or will go on to do great things in life, so they must be doing something right. Plus at least they aren’t Pomona. But seriously man, it’s weird and innapropriate for you to be writing/generalizing about the eating habits of individuals you’ve never met, so chill the hell out.

    9) I anticipate one person will make an ill-fated attempt at humor by insulting me or arguing against these “truths”. Who will be the first to try?

    10) Thanks for your time and have a good year everybody! See you at Burrito night!

    • DeusExMachina

      “1) I applaud Patrick Atwater for his attempt at an opinion piece, but it’s clear he took a few too many english classes in highschool and is now trying to use words he doesn’t completely understand.

      2) If anyone knows Patrick Atwater personally (like I do), they can atest to his being rejected by both Scripps AND cmc girls on a very very regular basis. So when he claims he hasn’t been dumped recently by a Scrippsie (Scrippser?) he is technically being honest, but he is also definitely skewing the facts. You’ll find Pat alone on most weekend nights hugging the wall in a NQ dance party with his hands innapropriately in his pockets rocking out awkwardly to Katy Perry.”

      Hyperbole is fun. You’re most likely to find Patrick–WTF is Pat?–on a weekend night alone in his room, reading airy-fairy crap like Simulacra and Simulation, without having taken a shower.

      Is it fun being an internet tough guy? Is it not as much fun to poke fun at Patrick in person? Or is it just easier when there aren’t any consequences?

  • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

    @Lance Moore,

    I resent how people always find the need to make some kind of snide remark about either 1) my hair color or 2) my glasses — such as when our esteemed censor-in-chief remarked that I was pudgy and “questionably evil.” (He had it inverted. I’m questionably pudgy and downright evil.)

    But thankfully, Lance has done me a favor, by comparing me to the greatest movie character of all time — “Milton.” Remember friends, that Milton wins out in the end sipping his admittedly fruity drinks on an island with the money that others stole on his behalf!

    Alas, the Milton look is soon to fade as I’ve booked an appointment to get contacts at the cheapest place around: Cosco’s.

    Perhaps when my eyesight is better, I won’t have to stumble around without my after a night of listening to Lady Gaga (or that I love College song), searching for my phone, wondering, oh wondering . . .

    …If anyone has seen my stapler.

    • Brian

      Charles, on the contacts note, can you just call cosco and schedule an appointment to get them fitted?

  • Lance Moore

    It’s easier without any consequences.

    But please note:

    I actually love Patrick (aka “Pat”) and I’m just messing around. He clearly picked up the good sense of humor that you are lacking.

    Charles: I’m glad you recognized my backhanded compliment, as everyone knows Milton is one of the greatest role-models of our generation and I was actually commending you. Live long and prosper.

  • Lance Moore

    It’s easier without any consequences.

    But please note:

    I actually love Patrick (aka “Pat”) and I’m just messing around. He clearly picked up the good sense of humor that you are lacking.

    Charles: I’m glad you recognized my backhanded compliment, as everyone knows Milton is one of the greatest role-models of our generation and I was actually commending you. Live long and prosper.

  • DeusExMachina

    Racking a sense of humor? Me?! Preposterous!

  • DeusExMachina

    Racking a sense of humor? Me?! Preposterous!

  • Glad I don’t know you

    Let’s just start off with…wow.

    Moving on.

    Unless you have some hard facts about the percentage of girls with eating disorders at Scripps compared to the percentage of girls with eating disorders at each of the other schools, I think it’s incredibly unfair to direct this article just at Scripps.

    And if there really is this huge eating disorder problem and Scripps feminism/philosophy problem as you seem to think, then don’t you think your article is only furthering the problem rather than constructively helping it.

    Focus on your own school before you criticize a couple hundred girls, most of whom you have never met.

    Ps. Angry opinionated articles are not the healthiest way to get over a break up
    Pps. She (and all the rest of them) was/were too good for you anyways.

    • DeusExMachina

      Your post has all the makings of a cliche girls’ night out at the Press: “He wasn’t good enough for you! You could have any guy you want!”

  • Glad I don’t know you

    Let’s just start off with…wow.

    Moving on.

    Unless you have some hard facts about the percentage of girls with eating disorders at Scripps compared to the percentage of girls with eating disorders at each of the other schools, I think it’s incredibly unfair to direct this article just at Scripps.

    And if there really is this huge eating disorder problem and Scripps feminism/philosophy problem as you seem to think, then don’t you think your article is only furthering the problem rather than constructively helping it.

    Focus on your own school before you criticize a couple hundred girls, most of whom you have never met.

    Ps. Angry opinionated articles are not the healthiest way to get over a break up
    Pps. She (and all the rest of them) was/were too good for you anyways.

    • DeusExMachina

      Your post has all the makings of a cliche girls’ night out at the Press: “He wasn’t good enough for you! You could have any guy you want!”

  • bigchris1313

    A wise man once said that arguing on the internet is a lot like running in the Special Olympics: even if you win, you’re still retarded.

    In before “You said retarded!” firestorm.

  • bigchris1313

    A wise man once said that arguing on the internet is a lot like running in the Special Olympics: even if you win, you’re still retarded.

    In before “You said retarded!” firestorm.

  • Patrick Atwater

    Let me preface this by saying that at this point in this discussion I don’t expect my views to get a fair hearing, mostly because I don’t really deserve one. But I will appeal to people’s better angles and ask that they hear me out.

    I actually wrote the post back in June, but the editors wanted to sit on it because they thought it was “interesting” and would be better posted at the start of school. The last thing I said to them was “Do you think that this crosses the line at any point?” I’ve actually had nothing to do with the article since then—editing, posting, whatever—because, believe it or not, I actually have other shit to do. I’m not trying to blame them but merely attempting to contextualize the situation so that people understand where I’m coming from–and why the article may seem disjointed at points. At any rate, I only hold myself accountable because ultimately it’s my name at the top of the article. And I am responsible for that.

    In retrospect, I think in my rush for theoretical cogency I ignored the varying legitimacy—both in terms of logic and discourse—of the particulars I used. I think this is where the outcry about generalizations come in. For example, I probably shouldn’t have insinuated that Scripps women generally think only white males can be racists.

    But take away some of strawman I put up and some of the hyperbole I knock them down with, and what have I actually said? What am I actually claiming in this article? I think that Scripps women need an education in how to live as good people—just like we all do. How is that controversial?

    More controversially, I think Scripps’ noble mission of gender equality and harmonious living has occasionally been perverted in a pattern that I outline in the article (notice I’m talking about ideas and not calling out people as some have claimed):

    “Its principles – therapeutic wellness, female empowerment, etc. – are so structured, so crystalline that the actual meanings underlying them apparently are irrelevant.”

    You see the same sort of thing in the comments on the article. People adamantly claim that it’s illegitimate for me to speak about Scripps of feminism because I’m not a woman. But isn’t that invoking the name of feminism against its idea? Shouldn’t I be allowed to speak about this precisely because I’m not a woman?

    Further, consider a comment about the successes of women who come from all-girls schools (from “I go to Scripps and I eat):

    “They are women who would rather succeed than be held back by a coed environment.”

    So are all other college girls ok with being “held back” or do they just not want to succeed? This is exactly what I was trying to get at: people are so set in their thinking that they don’t actually think about what they’re saying. It reminds me of a quote from Kierkegaard: “People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid.” Just replace free speech with a more Scrippsian universal ideal and the appropriate corollary and the analogy works perfectly. Now obviously this is true of other places and people—CMC included—but I found the Scripps example interesting so I wrote about them.

    So in terms of the logical failings and overreaching examples in the article, I have nothing but apologies to offer everyone—Scripps, women, men, whoever. My only regret in all of this is that I feel that I failed to make the point and powerfully and fairly as I could have and that I may have made the situation worse. So for that I apologize.

    Lastly, to all the anonymous cowards who have chosen to attack me personally, you’re a bunch of pussy ass bitches. And I live in Wolhford 220.

    • Pride is a Crutch of the Insec

      You state that Scripps has a “noble mission of gender equality” that should be honored rather than “perverted,” and yet you conclude your post by calling the men who have attacked you “pussy ass bitches.” Let me break that down for you. Pussy– a derogatory term for a woman’s vagina. Bitches– a disrespectful term for women. Not only are you implying women are weaker and more cowardly than men, you are using language that oppresses women on a daily basis. Don’t toot gender equality and then immediately propagate the opposite. That, dear sir, is the definition of hypocrisy.

      • I think clearly “bitch” and “pussy” have meaning outside of perjorative connotation to women. There’s plenty of reason to be critical of Patrick without this stupidity.

    • Pride is a Crutch of the Insec

      In terms of the rest of your post, your arguments are absolutely inane and merit no response.

      • Burn him, burn him!!!!!

        No thinking, just burning…

      • Chief executive parasite

        My dear friend Pride or (s)he who uses the crutch of anonymity, why don’t you relax and realize the poor boy is trying to apologize for a poorly designed argument? This virtual crucifixion of Patrick he probably deserved it, but there’s no sense in beating down a man who has admitted his mistakes and now asks for our forgiveness. Maybe you’re unfamiliar with the ways human beings learn and progress into better people, but nobody gets it right all the time. Your critique has been heard and now its time for you to disband from the mob lynching and step away from the dead horse.

    • Recent Scripps Grad

      Oh, come on. Your original article had little to nothing to do with saying that Scripps women need to “learn how to be good people.” (Do Scripps women need to learn this any more than students at any other institution, BTW? It seems to me a rather ridiculous statement.) But let’s deconstruct it a bit. What does it mean to be “a good person”? Is it really the responsibility of an educational institution to provide such training? Is it even possible for a college to do this? I’m rather flummoxed by this view. Are you saying that Scripps women are disproportionately likely to not be “good people”? Because that’s a ridiculous generalization and a character attack.

      If you had said that Scripps–like virtually all institutions–often fails to live up to its ideals, I would agree with you. But I find it rather specious of you to single Scripps out for criticism while presenting an entirely subjective, biased view of it.

      And are you saying that you have more of a right to speak about feminism because you’re a man? Because that’s a pretty ridiculous statement. BTW, many of the posters are saying your opinions about Scripps are not particularly well-informed because you haven’t experienced its curriculum and culture firsthand. I’d say the same about a CMC woman who made herself out to be an expert on Scripps. Good writers don’t pretend to have an expertise which they do not have. Enough with the “I’m persecuted because I’m a white man” crap.

      • I suppose if by deconstruct…

        …you mean take out of context: “I think that Scripps women need an education in how to live as good people—just like we all do.” And from the article: “Scrippsies – like all budding young adults – need an education in how to live as responsible, productive, and fulfilled people, pure and simple.”

        Then yes, you’re right.

  • Patrick Atwater

    Let me preface this by saying that at this point in this discussion I don’t expect my views to get a fair hearing, mostly because I don’t really deserve one. But I will appeal to people’s better angles and ask that they hear me out.

    I actually wrote the post back in June, but the editors wanted to sit on it because they thought it was “interesting” and would be better posted at the start of school. The last thing I said to them was “Do you think that this crosses the line at any point?” I’ve actually had nothing to do with the article since then—editing, posting, whatever—because, believe it or not, I actually have other shit to do. I’m not trying to blame them but merely attempting to contextualize the situation so that people understand where I’m coming from–and why the article may seem disjointed at points. At any rate, I only hold myself accountable because ultimately it’s my name at the top of the article. And I am responsible for that.

    In retrospect, I think in my rush for theoretical cogency I ignored the varying legitimacy—both in terms of logic and discourse—of the particulars I used. I think this is where the outcry about generalizations come in. For example, I probably shouldn’t have insinuated that Scripps women generally think only white males can be racists.

    But take away some of strawman I put up and some of the hyperbole I knock them down with, and what have I actually said? What am I actually claiming in this article? I think that Scripps women need an education in how to live as good people—just like we all do. How is that controversial?

    More controversially, I think Scripps’ noble mission of gender equality and harmonious living has occasionally been perverted in a pattern that I outline in the article (notice I’m talking about ideas and not calling out people as some have claimed):

    “Its principles – therapeutic wellness, female empowerment, etc. – are so structured, so crystalline that the actual meanings underlying them apparently are irrelevant.”

    You see the same sort of thing in the comments on the article. People adamantly claim that it’s illegitimate for me to speak about Scripps of feminism because I’m not a woman. But isn’t that invoking the name of feminism against its idea? Shouldn’t I be allowed to speak about this precisely because I’m not a woman?

    Further, consider a comment about the successes of women who come from all-girls schools (from “I go to Scripps and I eat):

    “They are women who would rather succeed than be held back by a coed environment.”

    So are all other college girls ok with being “held back” or do they just not want to succeed? This is exactly what I was trying to get at: people are so set in their thinking that they don’t actually think about what they’re saying. It reminds me of a quote from Kierkegaard: “People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid.” Just replace free speech with a more Scrippsian universal ideal and the appropriate corollary and the analogy works perfectly. Now obviously this is true of other places and people—CMC included—but I found the Scripps example interesting so I wrote about them.

    So in terms of the logical failings and overreaching examples in the article, I have nothing but apologies to offer everyone—Scripps, women, men, whoever. My only regret in all of this is that I feel that I failed to make the point and powerfully and fairly as I could have and that I may have made the situation worse. So for that I apologize.

    Lastly, to all the anonymous cowards who have chosen to attack me personally, you’re a bunch of pussy ass bitches. And I live in Wolhford 220.

    • Pride is a Crutch of the Insecure

      You state that Scripps has a “noble mission of gender equality” that should be honored rather than “perverted,” and yet you conclude your post by calling the men who have attacked you “pussy ass bitches.” Let me break that down for you. Pussy– a derogatory term for a woman’s vagina. Bitches– a disrespectful term for women. Not only are you implying women are weaker and more cowardly than men, you are using language that oppresses women on a daily basis. Don’t toot gender equality and then immediately propagate the opposite. That, dear sir, is the definition of hypocrisy.

      • I think clearly “bitch” and “pussy” have meaning outside of perjorative connotation to women. There’s plenty of reason to be critical of Patrick without this stupidity.

    • Pride is a Crutch of the Insecure

      In terms of the rest of your post, your arguments are absolutely inane and merit no response.

      • Burn him, burn him!!!!!

        No thinking, just burning…

      • Chief executive parasite

        My dear friend Pride or (s)he who uses the crutch of anonymity, why don’t you relax and realize the poor boy is trying to apologize for a poorly designed argument? This virtual crucifixion of Patrick he probably deserved it, but there’s no sense in beating down a man who has admitted his mistakes and now asks for our forgiveness. Maybe you’re unfamiliar with the ways human beings learn and progress into better people, but nobody gets it right all the time. Your critique has been heard and now its time for you to disband from the mob lynching and step away from the dead horse.

    • Recent Scripps Grad

      Oh, come on. Your original article had little to nothing to do with saying that Scripps women need to “learn how to be good people.” (Do Scripps women need to learn this any more than students at any other institution, BTW? It seems to me a rather ridiculous statement.) But let’s deconstruct it a bit. What does it mean to be “a good person”? Is it really the responsibility of an educational institution to provide such training? Is it even possible for a college to do this? I’m rather flummoxed by this view. Are you saying that Scripps women are disproportionately likely to not be “good people”? Because that’s a ridiculous generalization and a character attack.

      If you had said that Scripps–like virtually all institutions–often fails to live up to its ideals, I would agree with you. But I find it rather specious of you to single Scripps out for criticism while presenting an entirely subjective, biased view of it.

      And are you saying that you have more of a right to speak about feminism because you’re a man? Because that’s a pretty ridiculous statement. BTW, many of the posters are saying your opinions about Scripps are not particularly well-informed because you haven’t experienced its curriculum and culture firsthand. I’d say the same about a CMC woman who made herself out to be an expert on Scripps. Good writers don’t pretend to have an expertise which they do not have. Enough with the “I’m persecuted because I’m a white man” crap.

      • I suppose if by deconstruct…

        …you mean take out of context: “I think that Scripps women need an education in how to live as good people—just like we all do.” And from the article: “Scrippsies – like all budding young adults – need an education in how to live as responsible, productive, and fulfilled people, pure and simple.”

        Then yes, you’re right.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insec

    You state that Scripps is on*

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insecure

    You state that Scripps is on*

  • Irish Spring

    Patrick,

    We actually agree on something.

    I look forward to standing next to you on the wall of NQ awkwardly at parties and getting repeatedly “rejected” by scrippsies.

    Maybe they like hearing distinctly unique animal noises?

  • Irish Spring

    Patrick,

    We actually agree on something.

    I look forward to standing next to you on the wall of NQ awkwardly at parties and getting repeatedly “rejected” by scrippsies.

    Maybe they like hearing distinctly unique animal noises?

  • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

    Never have I witnessed such a self-cock blocking in my life. Well done, sir. Well done.

    • Groucho Marx

      Zing!

  • http://claremontconservative.com Charles C. Johnson

    Never have I witnessed such a self-cock blocking in my life. Well done, sir. Well done.

    • Groucho Marx

      Zing!

  • Zoe Larkins

    While Patrick’s criticism of Scripps may have been harsh coming from one outside the school’s student body, I find it justified, embarrassingly accurate, and releaving. The Scripps curriculum and “ideology,” as Patrick calls it, are hypocritical: CORE courses and a lengthy list of general education requirements are supposed to inspire critical thinking and develop intellect, but life for many at Scripps teaches conformity, beauty techniques, how to dress, and social skills. In fact, the Scripps general education requirements are intended not so much to emphasize Feminist theory, as Patick suggests, but to ensure that every Scripps student is elligible for Phi Beta Kappa, depending on academic excellence. Some might see this as exemplifying a commitment to graduating well-rounded, educated young women. I see it as a commitment to a label — a statistic to be cited in admissions materials, touted by proud parents, or dropped at a cocktail party. In some ways, Scripps seems more a finishing school than ever.

    I graduated from Scripps without having read any Feminist theory, with the exception of a bell hooks essay in an art history class at Pomona. I took it upon myself after graduation to read The Feminine Mystique, Naomi Wolff’s The Beauty Myth, and more bell hooks. Until finishing these books — weeks after leaving Scripps — I denied being a Feminist. I was afraid to identify as such while at Scripps.

    Now, as a self-declared Feminist-with-a-capital-F, I see more than ever the paradox of much of what goes on at Scripps and eating-disordered behavior everywhere. As a Feminist, I applaud Patrick for recognizing this and speaking out about the inconsistencies he observes. I wrote my article last spring and am candid about my disorder daily because I think too many people are silent about this kind of plague that is affecting women of our generation. I believe that the only way we can remedy this broader phenomenon and heal individual women (and their families and friends who are also affected) is to talk about the problem and their respective disorders. It is rewarding to know that my article incited this kind of dialogue, as evidenced by several responses to it printed in Voice (A legitimate publication. Back off on that one a little. Much of the writing is better than that in TSL, let’s be honest, even if sometimes it is about “lighter” issues.) and, now, Patrick’s post. It is enlightening to know that men recognize what’s going on, too, and that some of them, like Patrick, don’t like it. For many of us who suffer from eating disorders, and for many healthy women, too, our body images are contorted by what we think men want. How refreshing to know that you see “protruding collar bones” and not sexy decolatage! Thank you, Patrick, for speaking up, for engaging, and thank you for seeing past the fronts we put up and learn to perfect at Scripps.

    • well being

      “I believe that the only way we can remedy this broader phenomenon and heal individual women (and their families and friends who are also affected) is to talk about the problem and their respective disorders”

      Let me get this straight. Patrick is arguing that these wellness talks are bad, when he says “enough of this mental Valium that they call wellness talks”. You, Zoe, are arguing that the key to solving these issues is to talk about these issues. Yet you still applaud this article and agree with Patrick? Maybe I misread the article but I took it as claiming that wellness talks are a hindrance to body image issues and that people should just “stop fucking caring about what other people think”. That is complete hyperbole and does real damage in my opinion. The wellness talks are one of the few things preventing many people from going on crazy yo yo diets and from taking diet pills, or eating a carrot for a meal five times a week. Body image issues, as you must know, are complicated but people will do crazy things if they are unaware of the health consequences. This article claims that people should just “stop fucking caring about what other people think.” That is why this article is so detrimental. It makes light of a serious issue, and for whatever reason, you decided to defend the author. I just don’t get it.

  • Zoe Larkins

    While Patrick’s criticism of Scripps may have been harsh coming from one outside the school’s student body, I find it justified, embarrassingly accurate, and releaving. The Scripps curriculum and “ideology,” as Patrick calls it, are hypocritical: CORE courses and a lengthy list of general education requirements are supposed to inspire critical thinking and develop intellect, but life for many at Scripps teaches conformity, beauty techniques, how to dress, and social skills. In fact, the Scripps general education requirements are intended not so much to emphasize Feminist theory, as Patick suggests, but to ensure that every Scripps student is elligible for Phi Beta Kappa, depending on academic excellence. Some might see this as exemplifying a commitment to graduating well-rounded, educated young women. I see it as a commitment to a label — a statistic to be cited in admissions materials, touted by proud parents, or dropped at a cocktail party. In some ways, Scripps seems more a finishing school than ever.

    I graduated from Scripps without having read any Feminist theory, with the exception of a bell hooks essay in an art history class at Pomona. I took it upon myself after graduation to read The Feminine Mystique, Naomi Wolff’s The Beauty Myth, and more bell hooks. Until finishing these books — weeks after leaving Scripps — I denied being a Feminist. I was afraid to identify as such while at Scripps.

    Now, as a self-declared Feminist-with-a-capital-F, I see more than ever the paradox of much of what goes on at Scripps and eating-disordered behavior everywhere. As a Feminist, I applaud Patrick for recognizing this and speaking out about the inconsistencies he observes. I wrote my article last spring and am candid about my disorder daily because I think too many people are silent about this kind of plague that is affecting women of our generation. I believe that the only way we can remedy this broader phenomenon and heal individual women (and their families and friends who are also affected) is to talk about the problem and their respective disorders. It is rewarding to know that my article incited this kind of dialogue, as evidenced by several responses to it printed in Voice (A legitimate publication. Back off on that one a little. Much of the writing is better than that in TSL, let’s be honest, even if sometimes it is about “lighter” issues.) and, now, Patrick’s post. It is enlightening to know that men recognize what’s going on, too, and that some of them, like Patrick, don’t like it. For many of us who suffer from eating disorders, and for many healthy women, too, our body images are contorted by what we think men want. How refreshing to know that you see “protruding collar bones” and not sexy decolatage! Thank you, Patrick, for speaking up, for engaging, and thank you for seeing past the fronts we put up and learn to perfect at Scripps.

    • well being

      “I believe that the only way we can remedy this broader phenomenon and heal individual women (and their families and friends who are also affected) is to talk about the problem and their respective disorders”

      Let me get this straight. Patrick is arguing that these wellness talks are bad, when he says “enough of this mental Valium that they call wellness talks”. You, Zoe, are arguing that the key to solving these issues is to talk about these issues. Yet you still applaud this article and agree with Patrick? Maybe I misread the article but I took it as claiming that wellness talks are a hindrance to body image issues and that people should just “stop fucking caring about what other people think”. That is complete hyperbole and does real damage in my opinion. The wellness talks are one of the few things preventing many people from going on crazy yo yo diets and from taking diet pills, or eating a carrot for a meal five times a week. Body image issues, as you must know, are complicated but people will do crazy things if they are unaware of the health consequences. This article claims that people should just “stop fucking caring about what other people think.” That is why this article is so detrimental. It makes light of a serious issue, and for whatever reason, you decided to defend the author. I just don’t get it.

  • Zoe Larkins

    Please excuse my misspelling of “relieving.” Not, perhaps, the best case for the great education offered at Scripps.

  • Zoe Larkins

    Please excuse my misspelling of “relieving.” Not, perhaps, the best case for the great education offered at Scripps.

  • Let men be men and let women b

    I think this complicated issue has a much simpler explaination. Women and men function differently. While women sacrifice their bodies/psyches for beauty, acceptance, etc.etc. men do the same. For example, people can argue that all the binge drinking and hazing men go through to feel a sense of brotherhood, acceptance, and machisimo satisfaction are equally, if not more, taxing on our bodies and minds.

    At the end of the day, its all about insecurity and how we deal with it. We all act out and do stupid things to make ourself feel better, cooler, prettier, more confident, but at some point, people just need to realize that those things don’t come from the outside.

    Like Zoe said in her article, at some point, you just have to make a decision to stop.

  • Let men be men and let women be women.

    I think this complicated issue has a much simpler explaination. Women and men function differently. While women sacrifice their bodies/psyches for beauty, acceptance, etc.etc. men do the same. For example, people can argue that all the binge drinking and hazing men go through to feel a sense of brotherhood, acceptance, and machisimo satisfaction are equally, if not more, taxing on our bodies and minds.

    At the end of the day, its all about insecurity and how we deal with it. We all act out and do stupid things to make ourself feel better, cooler, prettier, more confident, but at some point, people just need to realize that those things don’t come from the outside.

    Like Zoe said in her article, at some point, you just have to make a decision to stop.

  • Lance Moore (5 Moore Suggestio

    Patrick,

    “Pussy ass bitches”? What a very professional and distinguished way to conclude your comment. Your parents and professors would be so proud of you, tough guy.

    As an aspiring life coach, I’d like to offer a few suggestions to you, Mr. Asswater.

    1) For all of our sakes, please start wearing deodorant. I know you think it’s cool to smell like a 1970’s animal control truck filled with feral cats and Indian food, but the rest of us don’t agree. We actually find it difficult to concentrate with your permeating scent attacking our nostrils.

    2) Please do something about your hair. Immediately.

    3) Don’t attempt to write about a subject you know very little about and then broadcast it to the entire community. For your reference, other future “off-limits” topics should include: Girls/Women, Love/Sex, The English Language/Grammar, Humility, How to make friends, How to dress, How to function like a normal human being, How to shower or bathe regularly, How not to seem creepy, How to keep it up, How to last more than 30 seconds, etc.

    4) Please keep your infatuation with the Tyra Banks Show to yourself. Perhaps if it was Gossip Girl I’d let it slide, but there’s really no excuse for your watching “Tyra” religiously.

    5) Apologize to yourself, your family, your friends, your fellow male population, and of course Scripps, for your absolute lack of respect, intelligence, dignity, and awareness. Just try to be SLIGHTLY less ignorant, man. It won’t happen overnight, so you ought to get started as soon as possible.

    CONCLUSION: It’s ok if you are insecure, I would be too if I were in your shoes, but you can’t project it onto others. You aren’t the brightest guy around, or the best looking, or the most athletic, or even very popular, but you ARE interesting and unique in your own way! You need to be satisfied with who YOU are! I know that someday down the road, someone will uncover a reedeming quality in you and you will let it SHINE!!!! With a lot of time and commitment, I think it’s VERY possible for you to develop from a sub-par guy into a middle-of-the-road type guy, and I look forward to seeing you progress.

    -L.M

    • Lance Moore=Pussy-ass Bitch

      What are you trying to prove? Real big insulting someone anonymously…

    • DeusExMachina

      Internet Tough Guy of Internet Tough Guys!

      A cookie to you, sir.

    • DeusExMachina

      Lance, you should head over to Wohlford 220 and give Patrick a piece of your mind and/or fist. I hear that guy’s a bitch.

  • Lance Moore (5 Moore Suggestions)

    Patrick,

    “Pussy ass bitches”? What a very professional and distinguished way to conclude your comment. Your parents and professors would be so proud of you, tough guy.

    As an aspiring life coach, I’d like to offer a few suggestions to you, Mr. Asswater.

    1) For all of our sakes, please start wearing deodorant. I know you think it’s cool to smell like a 1970’s animal control truck filled with feral cats and Indian food, but the rest of us don’t agree. We actually find it difficult to concentrate with your permeating scent attacking our nostrils.

    2) Please do something about your hair. Immediately.

    3) Don’t attempt to write about a subject you know very little about and then broadcast it to the entire community. For your reference, other future “off-limits” topics should include: Girls/Women, Love/Sex, The English Language/Grammar, Humility, How to make friends, How to dress, How to function like a normal human being, How to shower or bathe regularly, How not to seem creepy, How to keep it up, How to last more than 30 seconds, etc.

    4) Please keep your infatuation with the Tyra Banks Show to yourself. Perhaps if it was Gossip Girl I’d let it slide, but there’s really no excuse for your watching “Tyra” religiously.

    5) Apologize to yourself, your family, your friends, your fellow male population, and of course Scripps, for your absolute lack of respect, intelligence, dignity, and awareness. Just try to be SLIGHTLY less ignorant, man. It won’t happen overnight, so you ought to get started as soon as possible.

    CONCLUSION: It’s ok if you are insecure, I would be too if I were in your shoes, but you can’t project it onto others. You aren’t the brightest guy around, or the best looking, or the most athletic, or even very popular, but you ARE interesting and unique in your own way! You need to be satisfied with who YOU are! I know that someday down the road, someone will uncover a reedeming quality in you and you will let it SHINE!!!! With a lot of time and commitment, I think it’s VERY possible for you to develop from a sub-par guy into a middle-of-the-road type guy, and I look forward to seeing you progress.

    -L.M

    • Lance Moore=Pussy-ass Bitch

      What are you trying to prove? Real big insulting someone anonymously…

    • DeusExMachina

      Internet Tough Guy of Internet Tough Guys!

      A cookie to you, sir.

    • DeusExMachina

      Lance, you should head over to Wohlford 220 and give Patrick a piece of your mind and/or fist. I hear that guy’s a bitch.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insec

    That’s like arguing we can ignore the origins and implications of the word “nigger” because people use it casually on a daily basis.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insecure

    That’s like arguing we can ignore the origins and implications of the word “nigger” because people use it casually on a daily basis.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insec

    ^That post was meant for “…”.

  • Pride is a Crutch of the Insecure

    ^That post was meant for “…”.

  • CMC guy wanting some

    [insert haughty defense of Scripps women that seems passionate, sympathetic, and considerate]

    • DeusExMachina

      Indeed. Way too many White Knights in this thread. And for being nice guys, they’ll sleep alone.

      • B

        That’s a relatively retarded statement. Who said nice guys sleep alone? Definitely don’t, and it’s the nice guys that don’t end up divorced/abusing their wives years down the road.

        But hey, don’t take my word for it…

      • Anonymous coward

        Yeah, ’cause Patrick is totally gonna get laid after writing this. Women love it when you stereotype them.

      • B

        @ Anonymous Coward. The statements don’t relate. Stereotyping woman generally doesn’t fall under the category of being a “nice guy”

    • Barney Frank’s Sex Puppet

      50 bucks says he gets more.

      • Anonymous coward

        Judging by how bitter and sexually frustrated he comes off as, that’s not really saying much.

        @B – lol I was being sarcastic.

      • B

        @ Anonymous coward. Ah. My mistake then. Hard to determine sarcasm on internet forums sometimes =P.

  • CMC guy wanting some

    [insert haughty defense of Scripps women that seems passionate, sympathetic, and considerate]

    • DeusExMachina

      Indeed. Way too many White Knights in this thread. And for being nice guys, they’ll sleep alone.

      • B

        That’s a relatively retarded statement. Who said nice guys sleep alone? Definitely don’t, and it’s the nice guys that don’t end up divorced/abusing their wives years down the road.

        But hey, don’t take my word for it…

      • Anonymous coward

        Yeah, ’cause Patrick is totally gonna get laid after writing this. Women love it when you stereotype them.

      • B

        @ Anonymous Coward. The statements don’t relate. Stereotyping woman generally doesn’t fall under the category of being a “nice guy”

    • Barney Frank’s Sex Puppet

      50 bucks says he gets more.

      • Anonymous coward

        Judging by how bitter and sexually frustrated he comes off as, that’s not really saying much.

        @B – lol I was being sarcastic.

      • B

        @ Anonymous coward. Ah. My mistake then. Hard to determine sarcasm on internet forums sometimes =P.

  • Pingback: In Honor of Snow Leopard | The Forum()

  • Joe

    Great rebuttal, or greatest rebuttal? Especially #2. Ouch.

  • Lu.

    I read through most of these comments and some were spot on, others were hilarious, and some were just sad. So sad.

    Only a few people manage to talk about the standards that cause these women to adhere to such drastic measures to attain what they think is “beauty” on this campus.

    You see them roaming around TNC. They’re not over there for the damn atmosphere; clearly, these women (some, not all) are trying to make themselves more attractive for the men who are also roaming around TNC with images of Kim Kardashian and Kiera Knightly in their heads. With such a high emphasis placed on dating/hooking up around here, it’s really no surprise that eating disorders are prevalent in Claremont.

    You chose Scripps for obvious reasons. A women’s college, feminist ideals, visually stunning, right across the street. Okay, that’s nice. Now let’s take the focus off Scripps (the student body) and begin to look at Scripps (the institution). Then maybe we can turn a BLINDING light onto the SAME issues facing CMC women, Pitzer women, Pomona women and dare I say, Mudd women as well. This is not a Scripps phenomenon (eating disorders); this is much larger than that and I know for certain that we can all agree. There are just as many women at Scripps with eating disorders as there probably is at CMC. I wouldn’t be surprised to hear that eating disorders are more prevalent on those other campus because of a sense of 1) competition with other women 2) competition in regards to the disproportionate number of men (including tools) on these campuses. But I won’t make that into a hypothesis.

    Bottom line: This issue (if you are in fact talking about eating disorders and such) needs to be addressed as it applies to the women (and men) throughout the 5Cs.

    That guy who slurped down that protein shake this morning and left heavyweights to “train” and then didn’t eat anything else for the rest of the day because he’s working on his 8 pack? Signs of an eating disorder.

    Let’s have a public forum about this issue. Put all of the words and concerns right into action.

  • Lu.

    I read through most of these comments and some were spot on, others were hilarious, and some were just sad. So sad.

    Only a few people manage to talk about the standards that cause these women to adhere to such drastic measures to attain what they think is “beauty” on this campus.

    You see them roaming around TNC. They’re not over there for the damn atmosphere; clearly, these women (some, not all) are trying to make themselves more attractive for the men who are also roaming around TNC with images of Kim Kardashian and Kiera Knightly in their heads. With such a high emphasis placed on dating/hooking up around here, it’s really no surprise that eating disorders are prevalent in Claremont.

    You chose Scripps for obvious reasons. A women’s college, feminist ideals, visually stunning, right across the street. Okay, that’s nice. Now let’s take the focus off Scripps (the student body) and begin to look at Scripps (the institution). Then maybe we can turn a BLINDING light onto the SAME issues facing CMC women, Pitzer women, Pomona women and dare I say, Mudd women as well. This is not a Scripps phenomenon (eating disorders); this is much larger than that and I know for certain that we can all agree. There are just as many women at Scripps with eating disorders as there probably is at CMC. I wouldn’t be surprised to hear that eating disorders are more prevalent on those other campus because of a sense of 1) competition with other women 2) competition in regards to the disproportionate number of men (including tools) on these campuses. But I won’t make that into a hypothesis.

    Bottom line: This issue (if you are in fact talking about eating disorders and such) needs to be addressed as it applies to the women (and men) throughout the 5Cs.

    That guy who slurped down that protein shake this morning and left heavyweights to “train” and then didn’t eat anything else for the rest of the day because he’s working on his 8 pack? Signs of an eating disorder.

    Let’s have a public forum about this issue. Put all of the words and concerns right into action.

  • Lu.

    two typos:
    * as there are…

    * lift heavy weights.

    • Dave

      you spelled Keira Knightley’s name wrong…not that it really matters but as long as you’re listing typos.

  • Lu.

    two typos:
    * as there are…

    * lift heavy weights.

    • Dave

      you spelled Keira Knightley’s name wrong…not that it really matters but as long as you’re listing typos.

  • CDR

    seriously? how is this a scripps-specific problem? you don’t think CMC girls are like this? you don’t think girl culture at every small liberal arts college in america has the same problem?

  • CDR

    seriously? how is this a scripps-specific problem? you don’t think CMC girls are like this? you don’t think girl culture at every small liberal arts college in america has the same problem?

  • R.Ballard–Scripps

    The argument formation of this piece is comical. All of Atwater’s supporting evidences were generalizations. From lead-in to close, he had to first fabricate, stereotype or oversimplify in order to make a point.
    Some choice examples include:
    -The “Just Dance” Anthem…I think this was supposed to be obviously made-up & funny but err…yeah, I guess I just don’t get the joke because I think satire must play off a generally accepted truth. If you ascribe to the belief that the majority of Scripps women are hypocritical “feminist” airheads then I’m sure it was hilarious.
    -Feminism is a core ideology of Scripps. LOL. More like women’s education & empowerment is a core ideology of feminism.
    -The idea that we’re obsessed with championing the cause of body image is false. “Love Your Body Week” is just that—ONE week &, beyond that, many of the body image initiatives are 5C causes.

    I will say, though, that I am so pleased to see the responses from CMC students which don’t commiserate with this sort of idiocy. You are doing a service to the image of your institution and student body. I often have to remind myself that those who embody the pervasive icon of CMC students as insensitive, privileged, conservative assholes are also the most vocal & imbecile’s love to commiserate…loudly.

    “As a male CMCer Patrick, I felt like this article was overly harsh and rather unfair to women. Like “I go to Scripps and I eat” said, feminism is far from the core ideology of Scripps. The broad stereotypes and characterizations you engage about Scripps are about as true as the stereotypes that all CMC students are jocks, obsessed with making money, arrogant, and that they drink all day.

    I commend you for having the balls to write a controversial article. And if you had written something else, there’s a good chance I would support you. But honestly, on this one, I just think you’re wrong.”

    QFT

  • R.Ballard–Scripps

    The argument formation of this piece is comical. All of Atwater’s supporting evidences were generalizations. From lead-in to close, he had to first fabricate, stereotype or oversimplify in order to make a point.
    Some choice examples include:
    -The “Just Dance” Anthem…I think this was supposed to be obviously made-up & funny but err…yeah, I guess I just don’t get the joke because I think satire must play off a generally accepted truth. If you ascribe to the belief that the majority of Scripps women are hypocritical “feminist” airheads then I’m sure it was hilarious.
    -Feminism is a core ideology of Scripps. LOL. More like women’s education & empowerment is a core ideology of feminism.
    -The idea that we’re obsessed with championing the cause of body image is false. “Love Your Body Week” is just that—ONE week &, beyond that, many of the body image initiatives are 5C causes.

    I will say, though, that I am so pleased to see the responses from CMC students which don’t commiserate with this sort of idiocy. You are doing a service to the image of your institution and student body. I often have to remind myself that those who embody the pervasive icon of CMC students as insensitive, privileged, conservative assholes are also the most vocal & imbecile’s love to commiserate…loudly.

    “As a male CMCer Patrick, I felt like this article was overly harsh and rather unfair to women. Like “I go to Scripps and I eat” said, feminism is far from the core ideology of Scripps. The broad stereotypes and characterizations you engage about Scripps are about as true as the stereotypes that all CMC students are jocks, obsessed with making money, arrogant, and that they drink all day.

    I commend you for having the balls to write a controversial article. And if you had written something else, there’s a good chance I would support you. But honestly, on this one, I just think you’re wrong.”

    QFT

  • R.Ballard–Scripps

    Evan & Dave:
    wanna go out for a beer? Actually, I don’t drink beer (you know, the calories ack!)–sake bombing?

    sooo down.

  • R.Ballard–Scripps

    Evan & Dave:
    wanna go out for a beer? Actually, I don’t drink beer (you know, the calories ack!)–sake bombing?

    sooo down.

  • PB&J

    I agree that many Scripps students, perhaps more than most other coleges, are proponents of ideological hypocrisies and that the form that feminism has taken at Scripps is often belliggerent and nonsensical, but I don’t think your arguments or your writing style reflect the soundness of some of your valid points. The article comes of as a rant, rather than a coherent and educated argument.

  • PB&J

    I agree that many Scripps students, perhaps more than most other coleges, are proponents of ideological hypocrisies and that the form that feminism has taken at Scripps is often belliggerent and nonsensical, but I don’t think your arguments or your writing style reflect the soundness of some of your valid points. The article comes of as a rant, rather than a coherent and educated argument.