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3637758402_e300677769On Tuesday evening students were informed via email from their RAs that the semester-opening party events of last weekend were “too crazy,” and that talks yesterday morning between the RAs and the Dean of Students “could have resulted in an indefinitely dry campus”.

The email goes on to imply that  the RA’s have stalled any drastic action by DOS, but it also states that “things have to change” if CMCers are going to be able to enjoy the alcohol-related privileges they currently have.   The rest of the email is a reiteration of basic tenets of CMC alcohol policy:

1.     Put it in a red cup. If it’s not in a red cup, it will be confiscated.

2.     No glass. If you break glass at a party there is a $200 fine.

3.     If you’re in trouble, don’t be afraid to call the RA on duty.

4.     Drink within your limits.

5.     If it’s a CMC only party, all other students (and townies) will be asked to leave.

CMC Public Alcohol Policy: Alcoholic beverages may be served and consumed only at private events limited to members of the College community and their invited guests. Alcoholic beverages may not be served or consumed at events open to the public, such as intercollegiate athletic contests, or outside the confines of a registered and fenced party area. (Guide to Student Life page 32)

The email singles out “one particular event”, which for “privacy” reasons it does not disclose,  but which sources say was the transportation of a student suffering from acute alcohol poisoning.

But what does all this really mean?  At the beginning of each Fall semester people are excited to return to school and freshman are still adjusting.  There are a few problematic alcohol-related incidents.  These incidents in turn prompt a response from DOS, who, with our safety and the image of the institution in mind, make a serious attempt to “remind” students to follow the common sense rules that most of us have no trouble following. The past few years, actual policy changes have been a part of this cycle.  These changes have included a prohibition of outside drinking games (last year), and stricter accountability standards for TNC (two years past).  Despite these measures, CMC’s drinking culture has remained largely the same.

Tuesday’s meeting between DOS and the RAs involved a more serious conversation than usual about the evolution of the school’s drinking culture, and is apparently only the first in a series of meetings that may very well result in concrete measures to moderate a party atmosphere that DOS feels has gone from fun to dangerous.

Resident Assistant Caroline Taylor (Apartments, ’10), was kind enough to talk to the Forum about what is going on.  According to Taylor, the crux of the problem is that too much of the focus is now not on “partying” but solely on drinking.

“The culture needs to be where it was five years ago,” she says.  “We are on your [the students’] side.  We want people to be able to drink.  Drink in your rooms, take shots, but then go out to the party and socialize!  It’s just not about drinking everywhere.”

Apparently a big part of the issue being discussed is the prevalence of actual alcohol bottles, particularly handles of hard alcohol, being brought to parties like TNC.  When this happens, the focus shifts from a friendly conversation with a trusty red cup in hand to putting down as much booze as possible.  This is why the “no broken glass” and “red cup” policies are receiving extra attention.

The take away is this:  yes, there have been warnings like this in the past that have had no serious consequences.  This time around it looks like the real deal.

61 COMMENTS

  1. I just checked my inbox but I never got an email from my RA’s (Stark) which this article says was sent. Could someone please post the email?

    Also, just because the Admin doesn’t want to tell us what happened doesn’t mean students can’t offer up some details about what they have heard! Post away!

  2. I just checked my inbox but I never got an email from my RA’s (Stark) which this article says was sent. Could someone please post the email?

    Also, just because the Admin doesn’t want to tell us what happened doesn’t mean students can’t offer up some details about what they have heard! Post away!

  3. Well, seeing as how someone I know was almost hit by a dropped bottle entering Green Beach when he was walking in (dropped from the upstairs, and missing him by about half a foot), I would have to agree. While I would be a hypocrite to criticize anyone about drinking, people need to grow up.

  4. Well, seeing as how someone I know was almost hit by a dropped bottle entering Green Beach when he was walking in (dropped from the upstairs, and missing him by about half a foot), I would have to agree. While I would be a hypocrite to criticize anyone about drinking, people need to grow up.

    • Why does this have to be about “some dumbass freshemen?” They are NOT the only ones drinking irresponsibly and they are trying to adjust to a campus that condones heavy drinking. I have noticed that this year’s freshmen class includes a lot of students who have not been exposed to this much alcohol before and it can be an entirely overwhelming experience. The culture of college drinking is far and beyond the average social drinkers’ in the real world. We live in a bubble that does not recognize that 2 drinks a day is considered heavy drinking. So for those who enjoy a brewski everyday are on the verge of developing an unhealthy habit. It’s not to say that I think CMC, or any campus really, should be a dry campus, but rather that maybe something needs to be reconsidered about CMC’s attitude about alcohol and how it’s abundance on this campus effects freshmen.

    • Why does this have to be about “some dumbass freshemen?” They are NOT the only ones drinking irresponsibly and they are trying to adjust to a campus that condones heavy drinking. I have noticed that this year’s freshmen class includes a lot of students who have not been exposed to this much alcohol before and it can be an entirely overwhelming experience. The culture of college drinking is far and beyond the average social drinkers’ in the real world. We live in a bubble that does not recognize that 2 drinks a day is considered heavy drinking. So for those who enjoy a brewski everyday are on the verge of developing an unhealthy habit. It’s not to say that I think CMC, or any campus really, should be a dry campus, but rather that maybe something needs to be reconsidered about CMC’s attitude about alcohol and how it’s abundance on this campus effects freshmen.

  5. Wow. i dont think that RA could have gotten it more wrong.

    encouraging students to binge drink hard a in their rooms before going out, rather than enjoying a beer at a healthy pace at the party can ONLY lead to more hospitalizations/alcohol poisonings.

    If the objective is to minimize those types of incidents (which i realize might not be the entirety of DOS’s objective), then the administration should be encouraging a more relaxed policy in regards to outdoor (or at least in-dorm) drinking. they should be encouraging students to drink in a more public place. “drinking outside your limits” still has a significant social stigma at CMC, and if students were drinking in a more social atmosphere they’d feel pressure to keep it together.

    I think the simple solution is to just ACTUALLY ENFORCE THE RULES WE HAVE.

    I’ve never once had had to throw away my drink for not using a red cup, i wasnt even aware of the fact that there are no longer drinking games allowed outdoors, and ive never been told to get rid of my glass (although i did know we could be fined for breaking it).

    I think if the administration/camp sec/student security would just actually enforce these rules, then things would radically improve and students wouldnt feel angry because they’re the rules we already have anyway.

    seriously- why dont we try it for a while before we do something radical and reactionary.

  6. Wow. i dont think that RA could have gotten it more wrong.

    encouraging students to binge drink hard a in their rooms before going out, rather than enjoying a beer at a healthy pace at the party can ONLY lead to more hospitalizations/alcohol poisonings.

    If the objective is to minimize those types of incidents (which i realize might not be the entirety of DOS’s objective), then the administration should be encouraging a more relaxed policy in regards to outdoor (or at least in-dorm) drinking. they should be encouraging students to drink in a more public place. “drinking outside your limits” still has a significant social stigma at CMC, and if students were drinking in a more social atmosphere they’d feel pressure to keep it together.

    I think the simple solution is to just ACTUALLY ENFORCE THE RULES WE HAVE.

    I’ve never once had had to throw away my drink for not using a red cup, i wasnt even aware of the fact that there are no longer drinking games allowed outdoors, and ive never been told to get rid of my glass (although i did know we could be fined for breaking it).

    I think if the administration/camp sec/student security would just actually enforce these rules, then things would radically improve and students wouldnt feel angry because they’re the rules we already have anyway.

    seriously- why dont we try it for a while before we do something radical and reactionary.

  7. I have lived in Stark going on three years and I love it, but if CMC thinks it is going to change the culture by prohibition, let me just say that that is beyond foolish.

    If it really wanted to change the culture, it would charge students a lot more for ambulance rides after they drink themselves silly.

    Those students who were caught driving drunk should be immediately arrested.

  8. I have lived in Stark going on three years and I love it, but if CMC thinks it is going to change the culture by prohibition, let me just say that that is beyond foolish.

    If it really wanted to change the culture, it would charge students a lot more for ambulance rides after they drink themselves silly.

    Those students who were caught driving drunk should be immediately arrested.

  9. Let’s also have some more transparency.

    A great way to change the culture is to know and shame those who were irresponsible enough to get drunk enough to change the rules for everyone.

  10. Let’s also have some more transparency.

    A great way to change the culture is to know and shame those who were irresponsible enough to get drunk enough to change the rules for everyone.

  11. Student disciplinary actions as well as hospital visits are private information with good reason, Charles. I wouldn’t want that to change.

    More transparency is good in terms of what violations occurred, but names are not necessary.

      • I agree with you that shame can be effective; however, that doesn’t mean it’s the correct approach to a problem.

        If we make information about hospital visits public, students are less likely to seek help in the first place. I value our policies as they currently exist, but I am not going to risk students’ health to preserve them.

  12. Student disciplinary actions as well as hospital visits are private information with good reason, Charles. I wouldn’t want that to change.

    More transparency is good in terms of what violations occurred, but names are not necessary.

      • I agree with you that shame can be effective; however, that doesn’t mean it’s the correct approach to a problem.

        If we make information about hospital visits public, students are less likely to seek help in the first place. I value our policies as they currently exist, but I am not going to risk students’ health to preserve them.

  13. I think that making hospital visits public actually violates real laws, not just CMC policy. HIPAA anyone?

  14. I think that making hospital visits public actually violates real laws, not just CMC policy. HIPAA anyone?

  15. I know that some of the emails got directed into Spam folders (I don’t know why), so check there for the email – that’s where I found mine.

  16. I know that some of the emails got directed into Spam folders (I don’t know why), so check there for the email – that’s where I found mine.

  17. Nope, mine just showed up today. Maybe some of the RAs are a little more lax.

    Though I like how in bold it says CALL THE RA ON DUTY. How the hell are you supposed to find which specific one is on duty? So we don’t interrupt your dorms RA’s party time? Jeez.

    • It’s important to call the on-duty RAs because an off-duty RA could easily be off-campus (or yes, partying. It’s something we’re allowed to do). You’d be surprised the number of people who don’t call a second RA if they don’t get a hold of their RA.

      RAs on duty are posted on the RAs’ white boards.

      • Sure, but it wouldn’t be hard to let people know in advance who’s on duty, rather than calling an RA and finding out they’re off-campus or something.

        It’s kind of something you should have expected when you took the job. Plus, it seems in this manner of “shoving it off on the RA on duty”, what do you do if someone needs help? Just tell them to call the RA on duty?

        Just some food for thought.

  18. Nope, mine just showed up today. Maybe some of the RAs are a little more lax.

    Though I like how in bold it says CALL THE RA ON DUTY. How the hell are you supposed to find which specific one is on duty? So we don’t interrupt your dorms RA’s party time? Jeez.

    • It’s important to call the on-duty RAs because an off-duty RA could easily be off-campus (or yes, partying. It’s something we’re allowed to do). You’d be surprised the number of people who don’t call a second RA if they don’t get a hold of their RA.

      RAs on duty are posted on the RAs’ white boards.

      • Sure, but it wouldn’t be hard to let people know in advance who’s on duty, rather than calling an RA and finding out they’re off-campus or something.

        It’s kind of something you should have expected when you took the job. Plus, it seems in this manner of “shoving it off on the RA on duty”, what do you do if someone needs help? Just tell them to call the RA on duty?

        Just some food for thought.

  19. being an RA is a job, not a life…that being said, most times when something has gone wrong, you will see a majority of the RAs show up and help try to handle the situation…I would have a couple of RA’s numbers in my phone if I were you, and know who is on duty…That information is usually easy to find (posted on doors, emails) and in case you can’t get a hold of someone for whatever reason, all of us are always willing to help.

  20. being an RA is a job, not a life…that being said, most times when something has gone wrong, you will see a majority of the RAs show up and help try to handle the situation…I would have a couple of RA’s numbers in my phone if I were you, and know who is on duty…That information is usually easy to find (posted on doors, emails) and in case you can’t get a hold of someone for whatever reason, all of us are always willing to help.

  21. I think CMC’s lax drinking policy is one of the most important factors that differentiates CMC from other liberal arts schools. It attracts a certain kind of student and creates a unique community on campus. I think if the rules were to become more strict, like at other schools, then CMC would lose a critical aspect of the CMC experience. I truly value the fact that the administrators trust us to drink responsibly, and that honestly helps me keep my drinking in check and makes me look unfavorably on those who abuse that trust.

    I love CMC, and I recognize the very real dangers of heavy drinking, but creating stricter drinking rules would significantly change CMC’s community and culture for the worse. There have to be better ways to go about ensuring that the students are safe.

  22. I think CMC’s lax drinking policy is one of the most important factors that differentiates CMC from other liberal arts schools. It attracts a certain kind of student and creates a unique community on campus. I think if the rules were to become more strict, like at other schools, then CMC would lose a critical aspect of the CMC experience. I truly value the fact that the administrators trust us to drink responsibly, and that honestly helps me keep my drinking in check and makes me look unfavorably on those who abuse that trust.

    I love CMC, and I recognize the very real dangers of heavy drinking, but creating stricter drinking rules would significantly change CMC’s community and culture for the worse. There have to be better ways to go about ensuring that the students are safe.

  23. @ David Cook. Change us for the worse? Merely an opinion. You really have no idea that it would change us for the worse. Or for the better.

    I could use an example as Chico, California, where their university was stellar in the distant past, but they had to crack down because their students abused their trust and all it became known for was pulling in alot of dregs for parties.

    Sure, we have some elitist feeling of “upper class”, but the actions are still the same. When you see 5’5 girls running around with a handle in the hand and pulling from it, something should be done.

    And what “Certain kind of student” does it attract? I haven’t seen all that many people around here that are all that fantastic. Just people that think way too highly of themselves.

  24. @ David Cook. Change us for the worse? Merely an opinion. You really have no idea that it would change us for the worse. Or for the better.

    I could use an example as Chico, California, where their university was stellar in the distant past, but they had to crack down because their students abused their trust and all it became known for was pulling in alot of dregs for parties.

    Sure, we have some elitist feeling of “upper class”, but the actions are still the same. When you see 5’5 girls running around with a handle in the hand and pulling from it, something should be done.

    And what “Certain kind of student” does it attract? I haven’t seen all that many people around here that are all that fantastic. Just people that think way too highly of themselves.

  25. Dang. How did we get from a normal discussion from the top to someone trying to act all gangsta right above me?

    Back on topic, please.

  26. Dang. How did we get from a normal discussion from the top to someone trying to act all gangsta right above me?

    Back on topic, please.

  27. Every year its the same message (if not every semester, or every couple months): you guys are partying dangerously too hard, we are upset, and things are going to change drastically around here. I dont know if this is a brilliant strategy they have developed to accomplish their long term goals, or if they honestly believe it to be true, but its complete garbage. First, things never change drastically, period. They have on rare occasion implemented some drastic policy (no beruit, way far in advance registration for parties with a required security meeting, etc) but they either go unenforced or they disapear over short time. Second, while DOS is constantly trying to tell you that the school is partying harder and harder (and correspondingly stroking everyones ego im sure), the bottom line is that CMC now does not party nearly as hard is it did 6 years ago, and CMC 25 years ago makes CMC today look like a day care center. Im sure this may upset some current students to hear this, I know you guys still know how to party (I saw 601 this year), but things used to be even crazier. I can prove it: ask some old alums about their craziest stories and you will say “wow, that could never happen here today.”

    So why do they continue to send these email if things never change drastically like DOS says? Because the emails encourage how, over time, things have changed gradually, and this trend will continue until at some point we are a dry campus. It has been my opinion for some time now that this is the long term goal for DOS because our current situation does corresponds well with the school’s strategy to have the world look at us like Harvard. This strategy makes sense for upping our reputation, but I believe it is shortsighted and even dangerous.

    Our school’s policy is awesome for a couple reasons. One, it makes most students love our school to death. How fun and awesome is our school? Boner-swellingly fun and awesome. Second, it is safer. Allowing students to drink freely discourages drunk driving to LA and/or ripping 20 shots in your room before you go out so you’ll be sustained for the night. Finally, the policy is great because it requires and fosters trust between the students and the DOS. They give us fair policy and trust us to drink, we drink responsibly and trust them to be fair. This trust, however, has been threatened by the DOS for the past several years.

    Lets be honest though, DOS calls the shots not us. The only reason this symbiotic trust exists is because they allow it to. However, the shots theyve been calling as of late have been threatening that trust in my mind, and when the trust starts to disappear, the students feel less obligation to fulfill their end of the bargain (safe, on campus drinking) disappears. Why do I feel they have been threatening the trust? One we see obviously, the constant empty-threat emails. You dont make empty threats in a trusting relationship, you make forthcoming and realistic emails. Being forthcoming and realistic wont scare people into drinking less as the DOS would like, but it will help foster the trust, which I believe is better in the long term. Second, this is less visible, but the DOS has been strong-arming the student body more and more. I threw a lot of parties while I was there, and towards the end I started getting some serious bullshit excuses as for why we couldnt throw a party in this place/at the time/with that theme whatever. It was shit. There was never any rational behind it, just Jim telling me “Dean Huang doesnt want me to let this happen.” I felt like I was being irrationally controlled big time. Here’s a great example: after weeks of planning and hundreds of dollars spent, the DOS cancelled jello wrestling last year hours before the event. They knew what was going on, this party has been thrown for years, yet hours before the party, they decided it was inappropriate. Agree with them? I dont even care, to wait that late to cancel it was disrespectful to the people who put all the time and money into it, and it was irrational. That is what I mean by strong-arming.

    The CMC student body needs to send a message to the DOS that they are starting to see whats up and they dont like it. If DOS continues its current strategy, they will be seriously threatening the trust that allows our school to have such a great policy. I dont mean that to sound like a threat. I dont expect someone to lead a coup if jello wrestling doesnt happen, the coup will simply happen naturally. As the party scene gets lamer and lamer, more and more people will move off campus and/or party in LA. As the campus gets more dry policy, people will start drinking in their rooms more and alcohol poisonings will go up. A drier (or at least seemingly drier) campus is better for our reputation, but at what cost? I would be very interested to hear any comments on these thoughts if anyone actually read this whole thing. Why you would have bothered to read it, I dont know, youre in college, you should be out drinking. Cheers.

  28. Every year its the same message (if not every semester, or every couple months): you guys are partying dangerously too hard, we are upset, and things are going to change drastically around here. I dont know if this is a brilliant strategy they have developed to accomplish their long term goals, or if they honestly believe it to be true, but its complete garbage. First, things never change drastically, period. They have on rare occasion implemented some drastic policy (no beruit, way far in advance registration for parties with a required security meeting, etc) but they either go unenforced or they disapear over short time. Second, while DOS is constantly trying to tell you that the school is partying harder and harder (and correspondingly stroking everyones ego im sure), the bottom line is that CMC now does not party nearly as hard is it did 6 years ago, and CMC 25 years ago makes CMC today look like a day care center. Im sure this may upset some current students to hear this, I know you guys still know how to party (I saw 601 this year), but things used to be even crazier. I can prove it: ask some old alums about their craziest stories and you will say “wow, that could never happen here today.”

    So why do they continue to send these email if things never change drastically like DOS says? Because the emails encourage how, over time, things have changed gradually, and this trend will continue until at some point we are a dry campus. It has been my opinion for some time now that this is the long term goal for DOS because our current situation does corresponds well with the school’s strategy to have the world look at us like Harvard. This strategy makes sense for upping our reputation, but I believe it is shortsighted and even dangerous.

    Our school’s policy is awesome for a couple reasons. One, it makes most students love our school to death. How fun and awesome is our school? Boner-swellingly fun and awesome. Second, it is safer. Allowing students to drink freely discourages drunk driving to LA and/or ripping 20 shots in your room before you go out so you’ll be sustained for the night. Finally, the policy is great because it requires and fosters trust between the students and the DOS. They give us fair policy and trust us to drink, we drink responsibly and trust them to be fair. This trust, however, has been threatened by the DOS for the past several years.

    Lets be honest though, DOS calls the shots not us. The only reason this symbiotic trust exists is because they allow it to. However, the shots theyve been calling as of late have been threatening that trust in my mind, and when the trust starts to disappear, the students feel less obligation to fulfill their end of the bargain (safe, on campus drinking) disappears. Why do I feel they have been threatening the trust? One we see obviously, the constant empty-threat emails. You dont make empty threats in a trusting relationship, you make forthcoming and realistic emails. Being forthcoming and realistic wont scare people into drinking less as the DOS would like, but it will help foster the trust, which I believe is better in the long term. Second, this is less visible, but the DOS has been strong-arming the student body more and more. I threw a lot of parties while I was there, and towards the end I started getting some serious bullshit excuses as for why we couldnt throw a party in this place/at the time/with that theme whatever. It was shit. There was never any rational behind it, just Jim telling me “Dean Huang doesnt want me to let this happen.” I felt like I was being irrationally controlled big time. Here’s a great example: after weeks of planning and hundreds of dollars spent, the DOS cancelled jello wrestling last year hours before the event. They knew what was going on, this party has been thrown for years, yet hours before the party, they decided it was inappropriate. Agree with them? I dont even care, to wait that late to cancel it was disrespectful to the people who put all the time and money into it, and it was irrational. That is what I mean by strong-arming.

    The CMC student body needs to send a message to the DOS that they are starting to see whats up and they dont like it. If DOS continues its current strategy, they will be seriously threatening the trust that allows our school to have such a great policy. I dont mean that to sound like a threat. I dont expect someone to lead a coup if jello wrestling doesnt happen, the coup will simply happen naturally. As the party scene gets lamer and lamer, more and more people will move off campus and/or party in LA. As the campus gets more dry policy, people will start drinking in their rooms more and alcohol poisonings will go up. A drier (or at least seemingly drier) campus is better for our reputation, but at what cost? I would be very interested to hear any comments on these thoughts if anyone actually read this whole thing. Why you would have bothered to read it, I dont know, youre in college, you should be out drinking. Cheers.

  29. As an alum from 25 years ago, I’d like to respond to some of the observations of the recent grad above. The concept that ages ago we partied so hard that today’s CMC would look like a day care center is an utter fiction. Sure we partied hard, but the “big fish” stories old alums tell are just that. I can tell you that we drank with gusto, but everyone quickly learned their limits. The worst that happened in the aftermath of any partying would be some dorm damage. And yes, some of us got so drunk that we blew chunks, but that usually only needed to happen once (usually freshman year) before we learned our personal limits. In any case, from what I and my fellow alums can see, the current generation at CMC parties as hard as any of the previous.

    The biggest difference I see in the string above and the descriptions of campus life today, is that there is enough binge drinking going on campus that it is only a matter of time before someone dies. Whoever “blew a 40” is lucky to be alive. How would you feel if you woke up on a Sunday morning to find out one of your classmates died at your fun and awesome college?

    Other differences would be no one walked around swigging from fifth of hard booze (that would have been viewed as pathetic) and we didn’t need drinking games to pound a few drinks. We drank over the course of an entire afternoon/evening (call if social drinking if you like) rather than seeing how much we could consume as fast a possible on the front end.

    As for the social reputation of the CMC campus, as far as I can tell it is now one that revolves around binge drinking. If the recent grad is concerned about the administration trying to make the school more like Harvard, there certainly is a segment of the student population that is trying to make it more like San Diego State.

    I am not in favor of the college going dry – like the recent grad points out that will only drive the drinking off campus or under ground. Instead the student body needs to figure out how to avoid allowing its fellow students from getting so wasted that they risk serious injury or death. Yes, you do have that responsibility for each other’s welfare – that’s part of being a CMCer.

    Finally, the only violation of trust I see in all of this is that the school trusted the entire student body to act responsibly with alcohol and a select few students violated that trust. You blew it and you (not the DOS) need to fix it.

    Bottom line – have fun, but police yourself, watch out for you classmates, and avoid a tragedy. That’s leadership.

  30. As an alum from 25 years ago, I’d like to respond to some of the observations of the recent grad above. The concept that ages ago we partied so hard that today’s CMC would look like a day care center is an utter fiction. Sure we partied hard, but the “big fish” stories old alums tell are just that. I can tell you that we drank with gusto, but everyone quickly learned their limits. The worst that happened in the aftermath of any partying would be some dorm damage. And yes, some of us got so drunk that we blew chunks, but that usually only needed to happen once (usually freshman year) before we learned our personal limits. In any case, from what I and my fellow alums can see, the current generation at CMC parties as hard as any of the previous.

    The biggest difference I see in the string above and the descriptions of campus life today, is that there is enough binge drinking going on campus that it is only a matter of time before someone dies. Whoever “blew a 40” is lucky to be alive. How would you feel if you woke up on a Sunday morning to find out one of your classmates died at your fun and awesome college?

    Other differences would be no one walked around swigging from fifth of hard booze (that would have been viewed as pathetic) and we didn’t need drinking games to pound a few drinks. We drank over the course of an entire afternoon/evening (call if social drinking if you like) rather than seeing how much we could consume as fast a possible on the front end.

    As for the social reputation of the CMC campus, as far as I can tell it is now one that revolves around binge drinking. If the recent grad is concerned about the administration trying to make the school more like Harvard, there certainly is a segment of the student population that is trying to make it more like San Diego State.

    I am not in favor of the college going dry – like the recent grad points out that will only drive the drinking off campus or under ground. Instead the student body needs to figure out how to avoid allowing its fellow students from getting so wasted that they risk serious injury or death. Yes, you do have that responsibility for each other’s welfare – that’s part of being a CMCer.

    Finally, the only violation of trust I see in all of this is that the school trusted the entire student body to act responsibly with alcohol and a select few students violated that trust. You blew it and you (not the DOS) need to fix it.

    Bottom line – have fun, but police yourself, watch out for you classmates, and avoid a tragedy. That’s leadership.

  31. While it’s so important to keep a safe environment for the students at cmc, its also important and beneficial to cmc to keep us happy. Happy students give money back to the school. In 10 years time if I have the money and I look back thinking of how well cmc treated me, I’m going to want to give back. I don’t drink and I’m not a freshman, but I understand why people would want to. I love the social scene and I love to be at an environment once or twice a week where everyone is light hearted and having a banter. Bottom line is that they don’t seem to be doing anything to enforce the current rules, not impose new ones that will disappear overtime.

    Also, why are they punishing the rest of the school, when we have no problem drinking responsibly? Punish the first time offenders harshly, and if they do it again, they should lose their protection from the school if they are underage. I think that will be a good deterrent as well. They are, after all, breaking the law. It is embarrassing for us, as a school, that we have people that insist on drinking until the health authorities have to be involved. It is embarrassing for them, and it is embarrassing for their parents. If someone here drank too much and died from alcohol poisoning, i guarantee you that the school will take drastic actions that were unnecessary, and I would feel guilty. I shouldn’t feel guilty, because it will not be our fault, we can provide all the alcohol we want, at the end of the day, all it takes is for a student to say no.

  32. While it’s so important to keep a safe environment for the students at cmc, its also important and beneficial to cmc to keep us happy. Happy students give money back to the school. In 10 years time if I have the money and I look back thinking of how well cmc treated me, I’m going to want to give back. I don’t drink and I’m not a freshman, but I understand why people would want to. I love the social scene and I love to be at an environment once or twice a week where everyone is light hearted and having a banter. Bottom line is that they don’t seem to be doing anything to enforce the current rules, not impose new ones that will disappear overtime.

    Also, why are they punishing the rest of the school, when we have no problem drinking responsibly? Punish the first time offenders harshly, and if they do it again, they should lose their protection from the school if they are underage. I think that will be a good deterrent as well. They are, after all, breaking the law. It is embarrassing for us, as a school, that we have people that insist on drinking until the health authorities have to be involved. It is embarrassing for them, and it is embarrassing for their parents. If someone here drank too much and died from alcohol poisoning, i guarantee you that the school will take drastic actions that were unnecessary, and I would feel guilty. I shouldn’t feel guilty, because it will not be our fault, we can provide all the alcohol we want, at the end of the day, all it takes is for a student to say no.

  33. I vote we have RBts (resident bartenders) to teach students what to do with their hardliquor

  34. I vote we have RBts (resident bartenders) to teach students what to do with their hardliquor

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